Oiling/Knocking In
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NT50

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Oiling/Knocking In
« on: February 03, 2018, 05:27:59 PM »

Hiya guys!

After some advice on knocking in my new net bat as i've never done it before, have read the stickied thread on here but still have a few questions.

I watched the IJC video on oiling your bat but i reckon i've used a tad too much oil today (Paul said a roughly pea sized amount, i probably used 1.5/2 x that) Does this mean i should leave it for longer than 24 hours to dry and to start knocking in, or should i be ok to carry on?

I have a light kooka mallet and a heavier GN mallet. How long should i knock in with the light one before i move onto heavy?

Do i need to be a bit gentler with the toe/edges or hit them as hard as usual? (Also: with the edges, do i just hit it from a 45 degree angle or straight on?)

Cheers in advance lads!
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KW9221

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Re: Oiling/Knocking In
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2018, 06:50:19 PM »

I would give it more time for oil to soak in first then I will start knocking. Use lighter mallet for edges and toe and for initial knocking (about 30 mins to an hour). After that, you can start knocking with heavier mallet.
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InternalTraining

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Re: Oiling/Knocking In
« Reply #2 on: February 03, 2018, 08:00:51 PM »

What kind of a bat is it?

Not every bat needs oiling. If it is a big, high end bat, or very good quality G1-G2:

- I would either very lightly oil it or not oil it at all.
- I would knock only the edges and the prepare the toe region (4 inches) very well. I wouldn't mallet the middle, just knock using old balls in the nets.

If it is a normal size, low end G2 or lower grade bat:

- I would give it a single coat of oil.
- Knock the crap out of edges, toe, and the middle.
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Gurujames

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Re: Oiling/Knocking In
« Reply #3 on: February 03, 2018, 08:09:18 PM »

Personally I don't think the grading has any bearing on it. A well-pressed bat may need less knocking though.
Don't worry about over-oiling as it's an urban legend. And the oil only penetrates the first 0.1mm (ish) anyway.
Start knocking lightly on the edges and toe and gradually increase force.
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Seniorplayer

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Re: Oiling/Knocking In
« Reply #4 on: February 03, 2018, 08:22:21 PM »

Just to confirm hit the edges at a 45 degree angle with  glanceing blows also don't go to hard anywhere on the bat to begin with.
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KW9221

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Re: Oiling/Knocking In
« Reply #5 on: February 03, 2018, 08:22:48 PM »

Personally I don't think the grading has any bearing on it. A well-pressed bat may need less knocking though.
Don't worry about over-oiling as it's an urban legend. And the oil only penetrates the first 0.1mm (ish) anyway.
Start knocking lightly on the edges and toe and gradually increase force.
You are correct. Grading has no bearing to it. Some people think higher end English Willow bats don’t need oiling. Last night, I saw my new team captain showed me his two very expensive bats and they were super dry. They were so dry that edges were peeling off due to dryness. He told me “You never oil English Willow bats ever”. I just looked at him.
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InternalTraining

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Re: Oiling/Knocking In
« Reply #6 on: February 04, 2018, 12:03:14 AM »

Personally I don't think the grading has any bearing on it. A well-pressed bat may need less knocking though.

 A high end primo bat from a master bat maker like Kranzbuhler has gotten the necessary treatment for the bat. We are not talking about willow grading. Bats are graded again by the bat maker after they finish the bats. Keeley does that as well.
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InternalTraining

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Re: Oiling/Knocking In
« Reply #7 on: February 04, 2018, 12:06:53 AM »

You are correct. Grading has no bearing to it. Some people think higher end English Willow bats don’t need oiling. Last night, I saw my new team captain showed me his two very expensive bats and they were super dry. They were so dry that edges were peeling off due to dryness. He told me “You never oil English Willow bats ever”. I just looked at him.

A bat maker's grading (not willow grading) is a different story. Oiling and beating a high end bat is overkill.

You are going to fix dryness with oil? How does oil make a bat less dry or moisture-full?
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KW9221

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Re: Oiling/Knocking In
« Reply #8 on: February 04, 2018, 01:08:02 AM »

A bat maker's grading (not willow grading) is a different story. Oiling and beating a high end bat is overkill.

You are going to fix dryness with oil? How does oil make a bat less dry or moisture-full?

Preparing and looking after your bats prolong their lives. If you never oil your bats and keep them next to heaters, it will dry out your bat. I don’t know where are you getting your facts but you need to go back and check again.

All cricket bats purchased new must be run in.

Running In as outlined above is a process of ensuring that the owner of a new cricket bat prepares it for use against a new and hard cricket ball. All bats must be run in to both ensure the maximum performance of your cricket bat and to ensure its maximum life span.

There are cricket bats from some companies which are available new and 'ready to use' but we and others are not overly convinced about the merit of such an option as there is every possibility that these cricket bats may be 'over pressed'. Over pressing a cricket bat will extend a bats life span but will also and detrimentally reduce the performance and ping of your bat. A cricket bat should be crafted to provide optimal ping and performance and by knocking in such a bat properly yourself you are then able to extend the lifespan of your cricket bat.

Running a cricket bat in is in fact a very simple process but it must be done correctly. Please ensure that you run your bat in properly after purchase and before use against new cricket balls in the nets or in matches. A cricket bat which has not been run in may still perform ok but it will perform much better and last a lot longer if it has been run in properly. It is well worth investing a few hours over a few days to ensure your bat is run in correctly.

http://www.middlepeg.com/cricketbatcare.htm
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brokenbat

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Re: Oiling/Knocking In
« Reply #9 on: February 04, 2018, 02:19:10 AM »

Oiling and beating a high end bat is overkill.


No mate. In fact high end bats (willow is more delecate) generally need more preparation, not less. Doesn't mean you keep smashing it with a mallet, but once edges and toe is done, it's best to spend multiple hours in nets with good quality old balls. It will extend the lifespan substantially.
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InternalTraining

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Re: Oiling/Knocking In
« Reply #10 on: February 04, 2018, 02:32:47 AM »

Preparing and looking ...
http://www.middlepeg.com/cricketbatcare.htm


You are quoting text from an ancient web site.

This is the problem with cricket world:  we accept mythology without any basis in reality or science.
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InternalTraining

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Re: Oiling/Knocking In
« Reply #11 on: February 04, 2018, 02:34:46 AM »

No mate. In fact high end bats (willow is more delecate) generally need more preparation, not less. Doesn't mean you keep smashing it with a mallet, but once edges and toe is done, it's best to spend multiple hours in nets with good quality old balls. It will extend the lifespan substantially.

That is essentially what I am saying -  less mallet (only for edges and toes) and more soft balls in net for preparing the middle/face of the bat.

Still, oiling a primo, high end bat is overkill. Very little oil is needed, if any,  and then knock edges and toe area. Don't beat a primo bat with a mallet, just use soft/old leather balls in the nets for the middle/face of the bat.

Sheesh @brokenbat , you made me repeat myself again, and again so that there is no confusion. :D 
« Last Edit: February 04, 2018, 02:37:15 AM by InternalTraining »
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KW9221

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Re: Oiling/Knocking In
« Reply #12 on: February 04, 2018, 04:20:22 AM »

You are quoting text from an ancient web site.

This is the problem with cricket world:  we accept mythology without any basis in reality or science.
I don’t know mate. Every single retailer I have talked to told me about knocking every new Bat regardless of who the batmaker is. Please show me where it is said that those high end Bats Don’t require knocking. I am curious to know myself.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2018, 04:30:47 AM by KW9221 »
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InternalTraining

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Re: Oiling/Knocking In
« Reply #13 on: February 04, 2018, 04:33:43 AM »

I don’t know mate. Every single retailer I have talked to told me about knocking every new Bat regardless of who the batmaker is. Please show me where it is said they those high end Bats Don’t require knocking. I am curious to know myself.

I did not say that in my original post. I wrote: "Oiling and beating a high end bat is overkill." Preparing edges and toe is fine. Beating the middle/face with a mallet is unnecessary, soft balls in nets are good enough.

My original comment was about oiling. Read: Oiling. You said that oiling cures dryness of bat which I don't see working. In my opinion, oiling bats only helps with initial knocking, after that it is pretty useless.

Quote
Please show me where...

There is nothing to show. Cricket equipment world is full of bs/mythical information with no basis in reality. I don't oil my bats after first knocking. They have stayed fine after several seasons.
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Number4

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Re: Oiling/Knocking In
« Reply #14 on: February 04, 2018, 04:54:04 AM »

I’m more of a “roll” the edges on the side of the bath than knocking with a mallet... Tried and proven. Never cracked an edge on a bat in 30+ years of cricket
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