Custom Bats Cricket Forum

Equipment => Bats => Bat Making => Topic started by: Ryan on December 11, 2012, 08:57:27 AM

Title: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on December 11, 2012, 08:57:27 AM
I get a few messages/ emails each month asking for tools/ tips needed when starting out making your first bat. I should it would be a good idea to put a step by step guide together, please feel free to add or challenge any information given in this topic. I'm sure that everyone will do things slightly different.

Ok, so first up is the basic tools needed to get you going.

Number 5 vice - Quite expensive so secondhand would be a good bet or you could use a joiners vice instead

(http://i1248.photobucket.com/albums/hh498/Kelsallcustombats/record-irwin-no-5-mechanics-vice-125mm-5-in-50739_2.jpg)

Drawknife - Two types, one to shape shoulders and the other to remove wood

Normal
(http://i1248.photobucket.com/albums/hh498/Kelsallcustombats/image_3612.jpg)

Narrow for shoulders
(http://i1248.photobucket.com/albums/hh498/Kelsallcustombats/straight-drawknife.png)

Spokeshave - Again two types needed, one round bottom and the other flat bottom - used to shape the handle/ edges/ toe

Flat
(http://i1248.photobucket.com/albums/hh498/Kelsallcustombats/spoke20shave202-1.jpg)

Round
(http://i1248.photobucket.com/albums/hh498/Kelsallcustombats/web5130big.jpg)

Number 4 plane - usefull in shaping traditional bats

(http://i1248.photobucket.com/albums/hh498/Kelsallcustombats/stanley-bailey-number4.jpg)

Travisher/ round bottom plane - Used for concaved profiles (various of sizes available)

Travisher
(http://i1248.photobucket.com/albums/hh498/Kelsallcustombats/DSCN9750-1.jpg)

Round bottom plane
(http://i1248.photobucket.com/albums/hh498/Kelsallcustombats/18-h-r.jpg)

Rasp - Also used to shape handles

Sander - Various available

Sandpaper - very important to get a good quality of sandpaper (apply even pressure and don't skip grades)

Linseed oil or something to wax and buff with


The likelihood is that you wont need/ want to spend a lot on machinery but I've listed a few items to give an overview;

Bandsaw - Cutting splices & cutting the toe/ shoulders in a RAW cleft

Power sander - various available but I'd reconmend a pneumatic sanding drum attached to ether a lathe or motor (bench mounted)

Lathe - Handle binding

Like i said above, any bat makers please feel free to add to the above.

Ryan
 
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on December 11, 2012, 08:59:04 AM
I'll update with some pictures and links tonight.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Simmy on December 11, 2012, 09:06:50 AM
should do a video Ryan of what each tool is used for :P
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on December 11, 2012, 09:08:13 AM
should do a video Ryan of what each tool is used for :P

could do if there was any interest.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Chad on December 11, 2012, 09:19:37 AM
should do a video Ryan of what each tool is used for :P

It would be nice if he could do a video of that! Also to point out the tricky parts, and things like how to keep the spine central and straight. :)
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Red Ink Cricket on December 11, 2012, 09:25:14 AM
pretty much my set up as well mate.

also worth mentioning you need a decent bench. either heavy so it doesnt move or bolt it to the floor or the wall. nothing worse than pulling wood off with a drawknife and your bench is bouncing around the workshop.

i only use one draw knife. seems to do the job for both rough shaping/removal of wood and the more tricky handle shaping.

another point to add is something to keep everything razor sharp with. you soon notice if one of your tools is a little blunt as it chews up the willow or just becomes alot harder to get the job done.

there are some images in the Red Ink section of my workshop if anyone was interested in seeing a few bits before ryan gets some images done. i must admit from what ive seen Ryans got a pretty decent set up in his homemade workshop.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: ajmw89 on December 11, 2012, 09:35:47 AM

also worth mentioning you need a decent bench. either heavy so it doesnt move or bolt it to the floor or the wall. nothing worse than pulling wood off with a drawknife and your bench is bouncing around the workshop.


This and having a decent vice is key.  I'm working on fixing my bench to the floor and getting a better, heavier vice to weigh it down.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on December 11, 2012, 09:50:29 AM
pretty much my set up as well mate.

also worth mentioning you need a decent bench. either heavy so it doesnt move or bolt it to the floor or the wall. nothing worse than pulling wood off with a drawknife and your bench is bouncing around the workshop.

i only use one draw knife. seems to do the job for both rough shaping/removal of wood and the more tricky handle shaping.

another point to add is something to keep everything razor sharp with. you soon notice if one of your tools is a little blunt as it chews up the willow or just becomes alot harder to get the job done.

there are some images in the Red Ink section of my workshop if anyone was interested in seeing a few bits before ryan gets some images done. i must admit from what ive seen Ryans got a pretty decent set up in his homemade workshop.

Very good point there, a good solid bench fixed to a wall is ideal and will make your life a lot easier. Nothing more annoying then a moving bench.

I'll update the above with the extra items later.

Would it also be handy to list a ball park figure for tools etc?
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Red Ink Cricket on December 11, 2012, 09:53:46 AM
cost wise would vary i guess. ballpark may help. to be honest its probably just worth directing people to ebay or to their grandad/dads tool box. most of my tools have come from there. once i started making more i ended up upgrading bits and pieces and buying from woodworking specialist retailers to get bits and pieces.

a bit of research is also good. spend half an hour on google and you can find alot of stuff
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: ajmw89 on December 11, 2012, 10:00:36 AM
The tools I've scraped together so far, not including any sanders and polishing stuff etc, have cost around £70 getting them from car boot sales, here (Cheers Ryan!) and ebay.
So a coffin plane, smoothing plane, round bottom plane, several spokeshaves, travisher, drawknife and several rasps. If you know were to look, there's some great bargins to be had!
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on December 11, 2012, 11:26:52 AM
I've uploaded some pictures Ive found on google, I'll update tomorrow with pictures of my tools.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: mad_abt_cricket on December 11, 2012, 08:08:25 PM
Nice informative thread Ryan
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Sam on December 11, 2012, 08:23:02 PM
Wish there had been something like this when I was looking around :D , nice one mate.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: paulkatich on December 11, 2012, 08:27:13 PM
I got a spokeshave from Stanley (manufacturer). I never got it to work. May be the willow was hard. It was difficult for me to shave the wood.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Sam on December 11, 2012, 08:28:26 PM
I found it took a while to get used to. Gotta get it adjusted right and get the right angle.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: joeylough on December 11, 2012, 10:08:46 PM
great thread, think the videos would be great. There is currently very little out there for videos.

thanks fletch
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: charlie15 on December 11, 2012, 10:12:01 PM
Great thread Ryan, something I'm really interested in doing when I get started.  Ball park figures would be great.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Blazer on December 11, 2012, 10:19:25 PM
Thanks for this Ryan, epic topic  :) . Can we make this sticky please ?.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Perkins17 on December 11, 2012, 11:02:27 PM
Here is a list I did for Sam a while a go with prices and places to buy:
Drawknife - £30 (Ebay)
Spokeshave - couple of £ each on the Bay
No4 and No6 travisher - £30-40 each (Concaving)
Round bottom plane - £10-15 on ebay if you find one  (Concaving)   
Flat bottom plane - £12 tool station (ebay for wooden ones)
Smoothing plane (DIY Store or ebay)
Rasp- £17 (recommend this one very highly http://www.axminster.co.uk/ice-bear-japanese-saw-rasp-prod20284/ )
Sturdy soft grip vice - vice can be around £50 for a good one(ebay) and the grip things are around £3 (toolstation)

Basic for bat making
Spokeshave
Smoothing Plane
Vice
Drawknife(Not always needed for basic)
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on December 12, 2012, 09:51:02 AM
I got a spokeshave from Stanley (manufacturer). I never got it to work. May be the willow was hard. It was difficult for me to shave the wood.


I think you'll have had ether the blade set up wrong or the blade wasn't sharp enough. Which leads me on to my next topic - Sharpening

"When most folks begin to get serious in woodworking, they inevitably reach a point where the seductive handplane beckons. For some, the curiosity arises from an appreciation of the tool's design. For others, it's all about using a smoother to achieve a glass-smooth surface that requires no sanding. Whatever the reason, the handplane's siren song can be difficult to ignore.

 I seem to have fallen—hard. Luckily however, Fine Woodworking magazine's art director Michael Pekovich was kind enough to share his own sharpening methodology with me. And here it is:

Prep Your Waterstones
The process of sharpening a new handplane iron begins with flattening the back of the iron. But you can't obtain a flat iron using a wavy waterstone. So I begin the process by flattening my waterstones on a diamond plate. The procedure is rather simple. Using three successively finer grit diamond plates, moistened with water, I lay the stones atop each plate and rub back and forth, applying a decent amount of pressure. The idea here is to grind away the stone material until you've achieved a perfectly flat surface. And with diamond plates, it shouldn't take very long at all!
 
That said, diamond plates can be pricey, so as an alternative method, consider using 80-grit sandpaper stuck down to a perfectly flat surface (your tablesaw or jointer's table will work great).

Flatten the Back
 A newly-purchased handplane iron doesn't necessarily (in fact it probably doesn't) have a perfectly flat back, and a flat back is essential if you intend to produce a finely honed cutting edge. Lapping the back of your plane iron is a process you'll most likely only have to do once, so take your time and get it right.
 



Waterstone Lineup: This technique uses four different stones. From L-R: 800-grit, 1,000-grit, 1,200-grit, and a super-smooth 6,000-grit synthetic stone.

 
To flatten the back of your plane iron, set up a line of successively finer waterstone grits. In this case, I began with an 800-grit stone and worked my way up through 1,000-grit, 1,200-grit, and finally, a 6,000-grit synthetic stone. After wetting the stone with water, lay the flat side of your iron atop the stone and apply even pressure. Now rub back and forth for about 30-seconds to a minute on each grit. And remember, you don't have to flatten the entire back of the iron, only about the first inch or so. You should see an even, shiny polish develop across the back.
 
Grind a Bevel
 Next, take your plane iron to the grinding wheel. You'll need to use some sort of jig (there are many available on the market) to hold the iron to the wheel at the appropriate angle, in my case, 25-degrees (remember, this time you're working on the bevel edge, not the flat side of the iron). The smoothing plane iron I sharpened in the video below came with a factory bevel of 25-degrees and I simply set bevel-to-stone using my eyes. Fill the grinder's trough up with water, turn her on and move the iron left to right, back-and-forth, grinding the bevel until you see a uniform polish from edge to edge.
 
Final Honing
 Now it's time to really get down to business. The honing process is where you really sharpen that blade. Now, there are about as many distinct sharpening methods out there as there are woodworkers. I'll show you one tried-and-true method (as taught to me by Michael Pekovich), but don't be surprised if you read about other variants.
 
This honing method involves the use of a micro-bevel. At this point in the game, your plane iron already has a bevel on it of about 25-degrees. A micro-bevel is simply a very thin (about 1/32-inch) additional bevel added to the very end of the blade.
 



More than one way to hone a blade: For this job, I used a simple Veritas honing guide. That said, there are many different styles of guides on the market.

 
I first rest the iron atop my stone, with the bevel flat to the stone (at 25 degrees in this case). I then adjust the iron so that its back end is tilting up slightly (27-30-degrees). This means that only about the front 1/32-in. of the bevel is being sharpened. you want the iron to be tilted up slightly, so that you can see a bit of light between the stone and the back end of the bevel. Only the very front of the cutting edge should be in contact with the stone.
 
Once you've properly secured your plane iron in the honing guide, go through your series of waterstone grits, lapping the bevel with a back-and-forth motion. For smoothing plane irons like the one I sharpen in this video, you'll want to impart a bit of camber to the cutting edge. This is done by alternating the pressure your fingers impart upon the iron while holding it to the stone during honing.
 
Now that you've gone through all your grits, you will have developed a slight burr on the back of the plane iron. Use your smoothest stone (in this case the 6,000-grit) to polish off that burr and you'll have a razor sharp iron that's ready to plane.
 
Watch the Video to See How It's Done
 Note: Although you may not see it in the video, the progression of waterstone grits is as follows: 800-grit, 1,000-grit, 1,200-grit, and 6,000-grit"



Above taken from http://www.startwoodworking.com/post/how-sharpen-handplane-iron
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on December 12, 2012, 09:51:32 AM
There's also a video

http://bcove.me/v1udu4ce
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on December 12, 2012, 09:53:45 AM
Here is a list I did for Sam a while a go with prices and places to buy:
Drawknife - £30 (Ebay)
Spokeshave - couple of £ each on the Bay
No4 and No6 travisher - £30-40 each (Concaving)
Round bottom plane - £10-15 on ebay if you find one  (Concaving)   
Flat bottom plane - £12 tool station (ebay for wooden ones)
Smoothing plane (DIY Store or ebay)
Rasp- £17 (recommend this one very highly [url]http://www.axminster.co.uk/ice-bear-japanese-saw-rasp-prod20284/[/url] )
Sturdy soft grip vice - vice can be around £50 for a good one(ebay) and the grip things are around £3 (toolstation)

Basic for bat making
Spokeshave
Smoothing Plane
Vice
Drawknife(Not always needed for basic)


Completely agree with the basic tools above, you don't actually need a drawknife when starting out as long as you have a good small spokeshave to get in tot he shoulders.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on December 26, 2012, 02:52:22 PM
I'm going to be updating this over the next few days now that i have a little more time.

Is there anything that anyone would like covering??
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on December 26, 2012, 02:54:50 PM
Ps. I've had a little tidy in the workshop.

(http://i1248.photobucket.com/albums/hh498/Kelsallcustombats/IMG-20121224-WA0003.jpg)

(http://i1248.photobucket.com/albums/hh498/Kelsallcustombats/20121224_152016.jpg)

I think it works pretty well  :D
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Simmy on December 26, 2012, 03:35:43 PM
you have been busy eh lad! :)
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: wilkie113 on December 26, 2012, 03:37:42 PM
Ps. I've had a little tidy in the workshop.

([url]http://i1248.photobucket.com/albums/hh498/Kelsallcustombats/IMG-20121224-WA0003.jpg[/url])

([url]http://i1248.photobucket.com/albums/hh498/Kelsallcustombats/20121224_152016.jpg[/url])

I think it works pretty well  :D


Looks smart mate!

A little plane though ;)
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on December 26, 2012, 03:42:07 PM
trust you wilkie, always a kidder  :D
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: wilkie113 on December 26, 2012, 03:45:22 PM
Always gotta try and make a funny :)

You know I think it's smart anyway mate, you sent me the pictures
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Blazer on December 27, 2012, 02:48:12 PM
Can a flat spokeshave be used to round off the the toe and reduce the shoulders of a bat please ?. I am trying to convert a SH bat to Harrow height .
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on December 27, 2012, 09:35:00 PM
Can a flat spokeshave be used to round off the the toe and reduce the shoulders of a bat please ?. I am trying to convert a SH bat to Harrow height .

Your actually better off cutting the toe off down to the correct length using a saw of somesort, a mitre saw would be ideal for that but if you haven't got access to one then a hand saw would do, just make sure the cut is straight. Then sand the toe back to a round shape.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: DevAussie on January 05, 2013, 08:06:34 PM
Brilliant, informative thread Ryan!  I struggle with using the spokeshave so use my drawknife for everything.....I have a No4 travisher but I think it is blunt as I struggle to get any willow off.....

Do you get your tools sharpened professionally or do you do your self mate?
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on January 06, 2013, 04:57:34 PM
I actually sharpen all my tools, don't see the point of sending them away when it can be done. However I see round bottom planes and the irons are easier to sharpen then the travisher irons. 

Invest in a decent wet stone and a iron sharpening jig and you'll be fine.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: DevAussie on January 12, 2013, 10:57:33 AM
Cheers Ryan...hopefully when your plane arrives i can get rid of my travisher and the headaches!!
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: GarrettJ on April 03, 2014, 06:38:29 PM
What are the best brands under each category of tool

Drawknife
Spokeshave
No4 and No6 travisher
Round bottom plane
Flat bottom plane
Smoothing plane
Block plane
Rasp- (recommend this one very highly http://www.axminster.co.uk/ice-bear-japanese-saw-rasp (http://www.axminster.co.uk/ice-bear-japanese-saw-rasp)
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: procricket on April 03, 2014, 06:39:38 PM
John i have a spare spokeshave and rasp and a couple of vices you can have mate.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: hell4leather cricket on April 03, 2014, 06:41:55 PM
Sorby - drawknife older the better
Spokes have - Stanley no 63 round and flat
Stanley hand plane no3
Rasp- bahco
No4 Travisher
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: GarrettJ on April 03, 2014, 06:50:11 PM
Thanks for the offer Dave and thanks Mr H4L for your input, really appreciate it
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: GarrettJ on April 03, 2014, 07:42:31 PM
are these the correct ones?

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/316PQDWXKGL._SX450_.jpg)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41SNXBKB53L._SX450_.jpg)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/3114d-BLrAL._SX450_.jpg)



Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: procricket on April 03, 2014, 07:45:16 PM
That's the spokeshave and plain I have going spare bud.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Fezballoh on April 04, 2014, 05:46:44 AM
Them's the ones, Garret. No.3 planes are a wee bit smaller and lighter than No. 4's (as you might expect!) You can find them for around £20 if you keep your eyes open. Snell and Atherton heel shaves are the only tool missing on the list for me but they do the same job as travishers.

I'd agree that the older your spoke shave or drawer knife, the better. Something to do with the way steel was forged in the old days makes the blades super hard.

Another good rule of thumb when selecting planes is: The thicker the blade the better. Older, wooden planes normally have thicker irons that sail though stock and are less likely to 'chatter' as you work the timber. If you're lucky enough to find a Clifton, Lie Neilsen or Veritas plane for less than a million dollars (you won't!) then snap it up!
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: hell4leather cricket on April 04, 2014, 06:17:45 AM
As fez said the older the better , I find boot fairs ,antique shops and ebay the best places
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: GarrettJ on April 04, 2014, 07:56:03 AM
those lie nielsen ones certainly look the part but the no 3 plane is £250  :o

(http://www.classichandtools.com/acatalog/LN_No2_SP.gif)

and the block plane looks even better, not bad for £85 i suppose

(http://www.classichandtools.com/acatalog/cht_Lie_Niel_Bronze_Bloc5A2.jpg)
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: rbblack on April 04, 2014, 10:32:52 AM
Ryan's original image of the "Number 5 Vice" is now not available - can someone recommend me one?

I had assumed something like that would work (http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/111172847186?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT (http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/111172847186?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT)) - but now I'm not sure that's the best thing to go for?
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Fezballoh on April 08, 2014, 05:44:52 AM
Lie Nielsen use cast bronze instead of steel. Nice :)
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: GarrettJ on April 14, 2014, 09:44:27 PM
Which is best a Lie Nielsen no 3 or no 5 1/2 ? I have read that a 5 1/2 can do anything
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Fezballoh on April 15, 2014, 05:56:45 AM
A 5 1/2 of any make is quite a big plane. The 1/2 denotes that it'll be wider than a standard width bed. It'd be a good all rounder for a carpenter but if you're just going to make bats then go smaller and lighter for more control. I'll be honest, the only times I've seen them on site are when I've worked with green oak framers who spend all day making big mortise and tenon joints. It's your money but I'd keep the extra £200 for something else like beer unless that's what you do!
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: GarrettJ on April 15, 2014, 06:01:57 AM
Cheers I'll just go for the no 3, maybe a small block plane would be useful?
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Fezballoh on April 15, 2014, 06:14:27 AM
I don't really use one myself as I've found that the first stage of sanding moves a similar amount of wood. Not a bad tool to have though.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: e4sby on April 15, 2014, 06:15:21 AM
I might still have a small wooden block plane kicking about you can have John.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: GarrettJ on April 15, 2014, 07:32:30 AM
thanks e4sby, we can meet up for a net with ProCricket and Toenails and 123* when I come back if you fancy it and i'll give you payment for it.

The thing I dont want to do is try to make a bat without all the required tools and the bat turns out not to my liking and i get disillusioned. I dont mind if i have all the required tools and i turn out to be rubbish at batmaking, then i can just put it down to me not having the necessary skills and leave it to the experts!
Title: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: e4sby on April 15, 2014, 08:03:56 AM
If I can find my draw knife you can have that too if you know someone who will sharpen it.

I'll have a look down for a net, I've got to put up with Dave every week now so an extra night won't make much difference
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: GarrettJ on April 20, 2014, 09:17:21 AM
Are these dimensions to small for the required drawknife?

The teardrop-shaped handles are cocked at 45° to the blade and nestle comfortably in your hands. The polished blade is 100 x 3 x 19mm(4" x 1/8" x 3/4").
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: e4sby on April 20, 2014, 09:28:05 AM
Definitely too small - you want a drawknife with a 10"/250mm blade
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on April 20, 2014, 09:39:27 AM
I'm glad this topic is still going strong. 

A 4" drawknife is definitely too small John,  you'd need at lease 6" plus.

What are you wanting one for? General shaping or shoulders? I have a wide blade for general shaping and a narrow blade for shaping the shoulders,  seems to work for me.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on April 20, 2014, 01:02:11 PM
Quick update on this, I've been speaking with a couple of people and have suggested the following, I'm not saying this is a consice list but it's what i would recommend.


1. Decide what edge size and shape your going for, trace it on some card and then cut out. You now have a template to transfer on to your bats edge.

2. Use this template and draw on the profile on each edge making sure you line both sides up to keep symmetrical.

3. Use a flat bottom plane/ travisher to reduce the edges down to the required profile. I'd keep a couple of mm away from the edge line, this can be tidied up later.

4. Shape the profile with a travisher (I'd use a travisher rather than a round bottom plane, the reason being is that travisher blades are wider and more uniformed), keep away from the spine and remove weight mainly from the shoulder and toe are, keeping most of the wood where the middle position will be.

5. Shape the spine to give the required profile shape. Again this can be done with ether a travisher/ plane/ drawknife/ spokeshave etc. whatever you're comfortable using.
 
6. Fine tune the shape down to the required weight (i normally make the bat 2oz lighter) this will allow for sanding stages/ twine/ grip/ stickers etc

7. Shape the shoulders using a narrow blade drawknife and then smooth out using a narrow spokeshave, also a good time to shape the handle, again use a spokeshave for this. Then use a rasp to finish the handle shape.

8. Rough sanding, use a good quality sandpaper around 120 grit to smooth out any humps/ bumps etc

9. Fine sanding, again use a good quality sandpaper (i find that Aluminium oxide paper is the best) start and work through the grits 150/ 180/ 220/ 224/ 320. 320 is as high as you need to go on this.

]0. Buffing, apply wax and buff with a cotton mop.

11. Bind using waxed cotton twine/ apply grid and stickers


Narrow drawknife - Any old narrow blade drawknife will do, older the better - the steel tends to hold a sharp edge for longer.

Wood Spokeshave - Again any old wooden spokeshave will do.

Record Jake Plane - I think they're normally called a number 4

Travisers - http://www.tomthackray.co.uk/shop/ (http://www.tomthackray.co.uk/shop/) OR http://travisher.com/travisher-kit/ (http://travisher.com/travisher-kit/) (you get sent a block and you have to make the body)
 
Bench vice - Record number 5 (5 inch maximum mouth)

Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: tejasapatel on April 20, 2014, 02:05:05 PM
Wow..Ryan this a great bat making 101.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: rbblack on April 20, 2014, 07:09:22 PM
Just thought I'd share the beginnings of my set up...

(http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y285/Morgamus/IMG_0761.jpg)
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on April 20, 2014, 07:27:52 PM
Just thought I'd share the beginnings of my set up...

([url]http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y285/Morgamus/IMG_0761.jpg[/url])


Looks good Rob, only thing missing is a travisher IMO.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: rbblack on April 20, 2014, 07:32:09 PM
Looks good Rob, only thing missing is a travisher IMO.

Yeah that's the final thing on the list - first hand ones are pretty pricey though, been keeping an eye out for 2nd hand ones but they also seem to be like gold dust.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on April 20, 2014, 07:55:53 PM
Cheapest I've found is around 40 quid. Check out the http://www.tomthackray.co.uk/shop/ (http://www.tomthackray.co.uk/shop/)  link 
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Fezballoh on April 21, 2014, 06:05:05 AM
Profile templates are a must, I agree.

I would exercise a little caution using that rebating plane. They are great tools, but the point of them is to run them up against inside angles. You run the risk of the edge of the plane iron gouging the bat if you are going for a concave shape. This won't definitely happen (it definitely won't if you're careful!) but it is a possibility.

PS that is the cleanest vice I have ever seen in all my days :)
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Red Ink Cricket on April 21, 2014, 08:17:44 AM
I agree with Ryan, travishers are definitely a good tool to have. Some people struggle with them but I find them pretty easy to use.

I've got two draw knifes, a large one for general shaping and wood removal and a smaller one for the shoulders/ handle. It's only about 7 inches wide in total but I find it gives me good control when shaping the handle and shoulders
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: jwebber86 on April 26, 2014, 11:09:42 PM
ive been interested in having a go at shaping a part made cleft, done a few refurbs and really enjoyed it.

i am going to rummage through my dads garage to see what tools he has. he is a carpenter/joiner for the last 35 years and i know i have seen most of the tools i would need.

then just leaves the important part being the cleft
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: tuffers007 on July 20, 2014, 07:49:48 PM
http://www.woodenspokeshave.com/travisher/ (http://www.woodenspokeshave.com/travisher/)
would this be a good travisher to buy?
have resorted to buying brand new due to the fact that 2nd hand ones are like gold dust. i dont mind spending the money as long as i know its the right one for the job. hence the question. would be gutted if i bought it then found out it wasn't suitable!!!!
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on July 21, 2014, 01:08:54 PM
[url]http://www.woodenspokeshave.com/travisher/[/url] ([url]http://www.woodenspokeshave.com/travisher/[/url])
would this be a good travisher to buy?
have resorted to buying brand new due to the fact that 2nd hand ones are like gold dust. i dont mind spending the money as long as i know its the right one for the job. hence the question. would be gutted if i bought it then found out it wasn't suitable!!!!


Yes, I've got one of those myself. Very good in fact, although i made mine from a "travisher Kit" (http://www.woodenspokeshave.com/travisher/travisher-kit/ (http://www.woodenspokeshave.com/travisher/travisher-kit/)). The blade holds a good sharp edge.

Cheapest place to order one from would be (http://www.tomthackray.co.uk/shop/ (http://www.tomthackray.co.uk/shop/)) @ £48.00 including postage. I've also got one of these and they're good value for money - the blade isn't as good as the more expensive one but does the job.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: tuffers007 on July 21, 2014, 02:56:37 PM
cheers for the reply ryan. much appreciated. also need to book a visit to see you if possible? see just how everything is done properly!!
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on July 22, 2014, 10:29:01 AM
cheers for the reply ryan. much appreciated. also need to book a visit to see you if possible? see just how everything is done properly!!

Just drop me a message mate, happy to help.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: calcurtis98 on July 27, 2014, 09:04:29 PM
My grandfather is a woodworker/carver since he's retired. At the moment he makes things like lovespoons, benches and tables etc, after seeing this thread I am almost certain he has a few of the tools needed for crafting a bat so I am going to ask him if he'll give it a go. I will be back here to let you know if it's successful.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Silver Bullet on September 30, 2014, 12:15:28 PM
Can we sticky this please ?

Also, Ryan would you be able to rehost the images/videos... I wasn't able to see any of them.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on September 30, 2014, 12:27:01 PM
I can take some new images if needed, what would people like to see??? Keep it clean please  :p

Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: tuffers007 on September 30, 2014, 12:52:16 PM
your workshop, different tools you use and maybe a video explaining how you do each individual step. from shaping shoulders and handle to sanding and polishing?
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on September 30, 2014, 01:13:26 PM
your workshop, different tools you use and maybe a video explaining how you do each individual step. from shaping shoulders and handle to sanding and polishing?

I'll see what i can do, maybe need a little help though.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Neon Cricket on September 30, 2014, 01:22:49 PM
A video of each step would be awesome - I'm sure you'd rack up the views on YouTube pretty fast too (can only be good for the business!).
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Simmy on September 30, 2014, 01:43:23 PM
ryan i will video you etc if needed :)
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: wilkie113 on September 30, 2014, 02:26:16 PM
ryan i will video you etc if needed :)

Won't be the first time you've recorded him playing with his wood
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on September 30, 2014, 04:28:05 PM
Won't be the first time you've recorded him playing with his wood
Lol
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: wayward_hayward on February 09, 2015, 08:43:16 PM
Bringing up this old thread, some excellent bits in here. I want to expand my tool selection with the view to making bats over the summer. What tools would you recommend to buy? Anyone selling?

@Ryan the shared photos on the opening post are broken, any chance of re-uploading/updating?
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: GarrettJ on February 09, 2015, 09:07:19 PM
I'm happy to sell a Lie Nielsen no 4 smoothing plane made in the bronze version. Bought last summer and I don't use it for some reason.
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: Ryan on February 10, 2015, 01:21:52 PM
Bringing up this old thread, some excellent bits in here. I want to expand my tool selection with the view to making bats over the summer. What tools would you recommend to buy? Anyone selling?

@Ryan the shared photos on the opening post are broken, any chance of re-uploading/updating?

To be honest mate, you don't really need the photos re-uploading. Just copy and paste the descriptions, google is your friend  :D
Title: Re: A quick guide to making your first bat
Post by: KIPPERS on March 16, 2015, 12:15:59 PM
Well I think its time to give the old Pod shaving a bash. If anyone has tried n failed and has any old tools lying around. I mighty have a home for them.