Custom Bats Cricket Forum

Equipment => Bats => Bat Care => Topic started by: Gingerbusiness on October 29, 2014, 11:45:47 AM

Title: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on October 29, 2014, 11:45:47 AM
Morning All,

Since the twins arrived from John @ Red Ink, I thought I would show you the difference between a knocked-in and not knocked-in bat.

I would first like to say that both bats are made in the same profile and were pressed exactly the same. The pressing on these bats is soft.

Pre-knocking

1. I will ALWAYS remove all facesheets before knocking in. I have never, ever had a facesheet which, when knocking a bat in properly (Which includes the edges) survives fully intact. In my opinion, GN are the worst for this. I always have a touch of white spirit on hand. (I know some people do not like using it - however I have owned/been through hundreds of bats in my time playing and a touch of WS to remove left over glue has never done any harm).

2. ALWAYS oil the bat. I prefer to use two coats of pure linseed oil - leaving 24 hours between coats to allow for them to dry. (Always roll the grip up to make sure you do not get any oil on it, and NEVER oil the handle - If it gets into the splice it can weaken the glue). If you begin knocking when it is too wet, the wood will split, exactly the same if you let it dry out for too long. I leave bats to dry in a horizontal position and let gravity do its job. At this point it is very important to also oil the shoulders and toe. Both are areas where moisture can get in and do irreparable damage to your bat so it is important to protect them. For all the reasons above, it is important to leave 24 hours between second coat of oil and first round of knocking in.

Also, I know some people say 'I don't like my bats looking that brown colour'. I would say 'Get over it' unless money is no object and you do not mind buying a new bat every six games. It must be oiled in some way (Yes, bat wax has linseed oil in it).

Knocking-in

As I have mentioned before, I use a three-mallet system to prepare all of my match bats. A very light, varnished Ash mallet, a GN Oak short handled mallet and the big boy - a 1kg open faced Lignum Vitae mallet (See picture below).

Firstly, NEVER knock in the sides, back, handle or bottom of the toe of any bat. This can cause damage OR just be a massive waste of your time. The point of knocking in is to make sure the playing area is ready for ball impacts.

1. I use the ash mallet to softly proof and round the edges - striking at a 45 degree angle. I agree with Paul @ IJC that 'deflection striking' the edges is an inefficient way of doing it. (If the bat has been hard pressed - like some GM lower models, I may decide to skip this stage and move to the GN Oak mallet).

Either way, in my opinion, the most important aspect of knocking in is making sure those edges are fully rounded. In my experience, the edges are usually the first things to go when a bat is not knocked in properly

2. At this stage, I will use the GN Oak mallet to begin knocking in the edges and face with increasing force. Making sure to cover the whole face and edges. It is at this stage you want to make sure the face is no longer indenting and edges are not compressing further - before using the heavy Lignum.

3. Using the Lignum has been something of a learning curve for me. It is obvious that it must be used with caution as if struck too hard on an unprepared surface, it will break your bat. However, I have found if used as part of a process, it gets the best results. Personally, I use it to make sure the edges and face are fully compacted before giving it a final knocking in. This involves placing the spine of the bat on a hessian sheet, which offers plenty of protection against the floor, holding the handle. I then begin knocking the bat face in like a machine would, making sure the face is fully compacted and edges rounded (I never hit the edges as hard as the face for obvious reasons). At this stage, the grains should be beginning to open. This is a good sign.

You do not need to Lignum Vitae mallet to knock in a bat, plus they are very expensive, however having one just shortens the knocking in time due to it's weight and size.

Post Knocking-In

1. At this point, I will use Bat Wax (Find Salix to be the best for this) to give the bat a shiny finish. After all the knocking in and oiling, you will find that the finishing skills of the bat maker would have been lost slightly - bat wax just helps to restore some of that, along with sealing moisture in the bat.

2. I will then facesheet and toe guard all of my bats - you may miss this stage. However, if I am paying so much on a bat, why would I not do this? I may lose a slight bit of performance, but these bats represent money to me so I want to make sure they are going to last as long as possible.

Summary

Below you will see the difference between the knocked in and 'box fresh' Red Ink bats. Hopefully most of you will see the difference proper preparation makes (If you don't already!)

 (http://i1368.photobucket.com/albums/ag184/gingerbusiness/59606A0E-3E6D-414F-A3C5-D6DC5F760178_zpsjcottqjz.jpg) (http://s1368.photobucket.com/user/gingerbusiness/media/59606A0E-3E6D-414F-A3C5-D6DC5F760178_zpsjcottqjz.jpg.html)

(http://i1368.photobucket.com/albums/ag184/gingerbusiness/C3F0761A-7D58-4478-AA35-3744572CF000_zps98gve62i.jpg) (http://s1368.photobucket.com/user/gingerbusiness/media/C3F0761A-7D58-4478-AA35-3744572CF000_zps98gve62i.jpg.html)

Not knocked-In

(http://i1368.photobucket.com/albums/ag184/gingerbusiness/72B68171-CCA6-4CA2-B4BA-F5E7009FDB48_zpsx9lsjwl0.jpg) (http://s1368.photobucket.com/user/gingerbusiness/media/72B68171-CCA6-4CA2-B4BA-F5E7009FDB48_zpsx9lsjwl0.jpg.html)

(http://i1368.photobucket.com/albums/ag184/gingerbusiness/FF765864-525D-427A-9DEC-E66C771BE85A_zpsarj6n4hv.jpg) (http://s1368.photobucket.com/user/gingerbusiness/media/FF765864-525D-427A-9DEC-E66C771BE85A_zpsarj6n4hv.jpg.html)

Knocked-In

(http://i1368.photobucket.com/albums/ag184/gingerbusiness/47C7CE94-5FE2-4ABE-977E-054B748E6826_zpstxdouvii.jpg) (http://s1368.photobucket.com/user/gingerbusiness/media/47C7CE94-5FE2-4ABE-977E-054B748E6826_zpstxdouvii.jpg.html)

(http://i1368.photobucket.com/albums/ag184/gingerbusiness/5B929B6A-FE12-4689-B50D-998046C796FF_zpsbcvanqg4.jpg) (http://s1368.photobucket.com/user/gingerbusiness/media/5B929B6A-FE12-4689-B50D-998046C796FF_zpsbcvanqg4.jpg.html)

My Tools

(http://i1368.photobucket.com/albums/ag184/gingerbusiness/CCEE0F1B-A2A9-488D-B40B-83DC2CC2AF7D_zpsf7e7f0wl.jpg) (http://s1368.photobucket.com/user/gingerbusiness/media/CCEE0F1B-A2A9-488D-B40B-83DC2CC2AF7D_zpsf7e7f0wl.jpg.html)

Cheers Guys :)

Any questions, feel free to post and I am happy to help.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: wayward_hayward on October 29, 2014, 11:58:06 AM
Excellent guide and a good read. I will use this to help me out with my new Mongoose. One question, what kind of time frame did you use for the three different mallets?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: rahul_1987 on October 29, 2014, 12:23:59 PM
Really helpful information that. Up until this time I used to get the bats professionally knocked but would give it a try from next time onwards.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Alvaro on October 29, 2014, 12:33:02 PM
Nice step by step guide.

Good way to use up half-term when you're the only one in!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on October 29, 2014, 12:35:19 PM
Haha. Indeed.

My detentions from November to the summer are feeding a bowling machine for an hour and collecting the balls I hit all round the sports hall.

Got it made! ;)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: InternalTraining on October 29, 2014, 12:38:11 PM
How long do you wait before the last coat of oil and first round of knocking?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on October 29, 2014, 12:42:14 PM
How long do you wait before the last coat of oil and first round of knocking?

24 hours again.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: jamielsn15 on October 29, 2014, 12:49:10 PM
Excellent guide, thanks for this, it's good to know I'm not going far wrong!

I also think there's a sense of accomplishment and satisfaction in knocking in your bat - knowing that you've put the final touches on a bat that performs well.  Invest the time and reap the rewards...
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on October 29, 2014, 01:09:40 PM
It's got to a point that mates will pay me to knock their bats in because, when it is done properly, it really does improve performance along with longevity
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Kez on October 29, 2014, 02:05:56 PM
Do I spot feathering on the toe post knocking in?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on October 29, 2014, 02:12:34 PM
Indeed you do.

This occurs due to the way I want MY bats knocked in. I want the toe as knocked in and compressed as possible and having rounded corners on square toes (never had this problem on my old Mjolnirs due to rounded toes). I toe guard all my bats so the feathering is not a problem at all and is sealed with bit of super glue.

I appreciate this is not for everyone :)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on October 29, 2014, 02:15:41 PM
I can see why some people might not like it, but that feathering looks superficial to me anyway, the adhesive you use when applying to toe guard will probably fix that.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: InternalTraining on October 29, 2014, 02:26:36 PM

I appreciate this is not for everyone :)

This is great information GB, thanks for sharing .  :)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on October 29, 2014, 02:28:32 PM

I can see why some people might not like it, but that feathering looks superficial to me anyway, the adhesive you use when applying to toe guard will probably fix that.

All toes will feather at some point.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on October 29, 2014, 02:34:34 PM
All toes will feather at some point.
But not always during the knocking in process!  :D
It's nothing a bit of glue wont solve but people might get a bit funny about having to repair their brand new bat haha
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on October 29, 2014, 02:37:12 PM

But not always during the knocking in process!  :D
It's nothing a bit of glue wont solve but people might get a bit funny about having to repair their brand new bat haha

True dat!

However, I did say it is 'MY' preference. I'd rather have rounded corners and a little feathering - rather than square toes which may crack/break/feather quicker
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: tejasapatel on October 29, 2014, 05:29:18 PM
Great guide to knocking in. The only question is roughly how much time do you spend doing each step and with each mallet.

Thanks again for the detailed write up.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on October 30, 2014, 10:03:05 AM
That depends on the pressing of the bat. Anything from 30 mins to 90 mins
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: sarg on October 30, 2014, 09:16:37 PM
I do the same but without a LV mallet. I'll give it 2-3 hours. I've also gaffer taped a 100 g strip of lead flashing to one of my mallets so I can shorten my swing for a more consistent impact force.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on October 30, 2014, 09:19:50 PM
I do the same but without a LV mallet. I'll give it 2-3 hours. I've also gaffer taped a 100 g strip of lead flashing to one of my mallets so I can shorten my swing for a more consistent impact force.

Good ideas :)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Chad on October 30, 2014, 10:48:10 PM
Top guide, pretty much what I do now, except if there's a scuff on it already, I'll just leave it on, and try my best to round the edges. Tip is to use a touch of linseed oil and apply it down the edges before rolling or knocking with a scuff on. Fibreglass tape also helps prevent the scuff from tearing!

Find that my LV is amazing and does cut down time quite noticeably, but I will probably only use it for about 5-10 minutes at a time, simply because the weight of it can hurt my wrist. I kind of wish I went for a 750g instead of a 1kg one, as I am used to using shorter handled mallets!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on October 30, 2014, 11:13:47 PM

Top guide, pretty much what I do now, except if there's a scuff on it already, I'll just leave it on, and try my best to round the edges. Tip is to use a touch of linseed oil and apply it down the edges before rolling or knocking with a scuff on. Fibreglass tape also helps prevent the scuff from tearing!

Find that my LV is amazing and does cut down time quite noticeably, but I will probably only use it for about 5-10 minutes at a time, simply because the weight of it can hurt my wrist. I kind of wish I went for a 750g instead of a 1kg one, as I am used to using shorter handled mallets!

My problem as well. Actually now use my lifting wrist supports when I do it. Really helps!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: blocka on October 30, 2014, 11:25:09 PM
Excellent write up, wish I could justify a LV mallet. I find my deluxe GN is pretty damn good at doing the job.
Title: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on October 30, 2014, 11:29:19 PM
Yeah - The GN Deluxe mallet is stage two in my process and does a superb job on its own. The lignum just cuts down on time spent :)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: blocka on October 31, 2014, 12:27:47 AM

Yeah - The GN Deluxe mallet is stage two in my process and does a superb job on its own. The lignum just cuts down on time spent :)
No doubt, if I knocked in a lot I'd have one but for how many bats I go through I can't justify it. Then again do we ever need a reason to with cricket gear lol
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on October 31, 2014, 12:31:00 AM
I certainly don't! I have far too much gear!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Number4 on October 31, 2014, 07:02:44 AM
I always like to roll my edges on the round edge of the bath tub.... You can get good pressure, it takes the squareness off and then they are pretty much done... Knock in the face and toe area and your good to go
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Kez on October 31, 2014, 01:21:47 PM
I find the round edge of the work top in the kitchen does a good job too.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on October 31, 2014, 01:23:58 PM
I find the round edge of the work top in the kitchen does a good job too.

Exactly what I use. Should update my process with all of your ideas. We could patent a professional process.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Seniorplayer on October 31, 2014, 03:04:55 PM
With regard to bats turning brown after oiling i apply 3coats of linseed over 2 weeks let the oil soak in and dry for a further 3 weeks and then use 320 grit sandpaper and gently rub the blade till it becomes nice and white done this for years and never had a bat split or break.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: sl1988 on November 02, 2014, 09:39:26 AM
ok, been reading this thread to get some advice as I'm knocking in my new bat atm. ok I have a question - what exactly does linseed oil do? Does it actually seal the moisture in? or does just create a very soft boundary layer which is more susceptible to knocks etc? in that case would it not be detrimental to performance? as the whole point of knocking in is to create a hard crust and the linseed oil does the opposite? would love to hear your thoughts
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on November 02, 2014, 10:04:54 AM
Morning.

Linseed oil is used for two key reasons;

1. Keeps moisture out of the bat during use, which can cause the wood to become brittle

2. Allow the wood to be safely knocked in - reducing the risk of cracking during the process
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: sl1988 on November 02, 2014, 10:13:52 AM
thanks for the quick reply.

Isn't wood very porous anyway? i.e. ive just read some threads saying laver and woods gain weight after coming to England regardless whether they are oiled etc. so wouldn't this whole sealing in the moisture thing be an old wives tale?

I agree on number 2. However wouldn't having a scuff sheet do the same thing by holding the fibres together? plus it would not soften the willow which in turn should increase performance?

might be completely wrong but just my thinking on the whole matter!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on November 02, 2014, 10:21:02 AM
1. Wood is porous but the oil stops water-based moisture getting into the wood, lifting it.

2. Yes. You can just use a scuff sheet. However in my opinion, knocking in usually destroys scuff sheets around the edges.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Seniorplayer on November 02, 2014, 10:32:46 AM
Raw linseed oil ( flax oil) on the face  ( and toe to prevent damp) nourishes the willow as it soaks in.
It also retains the moisture already in the wood which is essential especially with a new bat which should have been made with the willow at the correct moisture content which is achieved by air and or kiln drying.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: tim2000s on November 02, 2014, 10:41:37 AM
The other point to bear in mind about linseed is that it aids the wood fibres binding together as you knock it in. Even though it might not seem it,  it is definitely a good thing.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on November 02, 2014, 10:43:29 AM

The other point to bear in mind about linseed is that it aids the wood fibres binding together as you knock it in. Even though it might not seem it,  it is definitely a good thing.

Very true Tim :)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: sl1988 on November 02, 2014, 12:20:31 PM
thanks for the advice guys!

another quick question - going a bit off topic here. Helicopter scuff sheet or hammer edge? Thinking of getting these off bulldog but i'm not decided which one! If I get the helicopter I can get them to any length any cover the whole blade (even over the stickers) + they are clear I think. Hammer edge is translucent but a lot stiffer so less of a performance hit?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on November 02, 2014, 12:22:17 PM
Helicopter for me.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on November 02, 2014, 12:41:56 PM
thanks for the advice guys!

another quick question - going a bit off topic here. Helicopter scuff sheet or hammer edge? Thinking of getting these off bulldog but i'm not decided which one! If I get the helicopter I can get them to any length any cover the whole blade (even over the stickers) + they are clear I think. Hammer edge is translucent but a lot stiffer so less of a performance hit?
Helicopter looks nicer and is easier to apply.
As far as performance, the difference is so minute it doesn't matter!

Personally I prefer helicopter as I can cover up to the embossed part of the stickers so there's no part of the face exposed, whereas the hammer edge are pre cut so you have to work with what you've got.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: joeljonno on November 03, 2014, 02:47:59 PM
Here's how I do my bats....

Let my two year old do it for me.

(http://i1296.photobucket.com/albums/ag13/joeljonno/54E89B08-D749-4CC7-B47E-344DF03D8870_zps4iaflk35.jpg) (http://s1296.photobucket.com/user/joeljonno/media/54E89B08-D749-4CC7-B47E-344DF03D8870_zps4iaflk35.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: TBONTB on November 03, 2014, 02:54:25 PM
No need to put in a machine. Just give a child a mallet and red bull let them go mad for a few hours bobs your uncle. New business right there!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on November 09, 2014, 05:58:54 PM
After reading your excellent guide, I removed the scuff sheets from my new SSs and gave a modified version your process a go (minus the LV mallet as I don't own one).

I've done two bats so far and am pleased with the results.

After a healthy coat of Oil for each bat, I started off by rounding the edges on the bath. I felt this was better than going straight in with the mallet as it did the whole edge evenly (the same principal as Paul from IJC using the mallet handle to start rounding the edges.

I then started hitting the edges with my lighter mallet (369g), further compressing them. This made a sort of lip, the edge was compressed and the unknocked face was raised slightly higher.
Once this mallet was not compressing the edges any further I levelled out the face as best I could. As I had another heavier mallet to move on to this was a fairly rough job, but the bat was close enough to level before I moved on.

I then used my newly purchased Slazenger mallet/grip cone combo to finish the job. (638g with a longer handle, so more mallet speed!)
I bought this from Eclipse all sports for less than 3 and had planned to add weight to it. Anyway - back on topic...
I then went back to work on the edge, starting lightly then increasing the force with which I hit the bat, again until the mallet was no longer making any new indentations.
From there I rounded the toe as well, going until the bat started lightly feathering (which was after a surprising amount of rounding!)
With the edges and toe done I evened the face again. This time I gave the middle a good hard wack to use as a guideline. Once the face was perfectly even (as this was the final stage I was a bit more precise about finishing it nicely).

The final stage was to glue the newly feathered toe so it's not going anywhere (or getting any worse).
As I'm now happy these are both fully knocked in I will apply some shoo goo to the toe, and maybe apply a new scuff sheet (although I'm toying with leaving them natural and only having a scuff sheet on my match bat).

Thanks again for the detailed guide, and apologies for rambling on!  :)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: tommo256 on November 09, 2014, 06:04:18 PM
Im probably gonna annoy a lot of people, I've never knocked a bat in. I get my bats normally from hunts, get them to give it another press, stick a cover sheet on it then use it in nets!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: 19reading87 on November 09, 2014, 06:21:50 PM
Im probably gonna annoy a lot of people, I've never knocked a bat in. I get my bats normally from hunts, get them to give it another press, stick a cover sheet on it then use it in nets!

But you're a bowler so your bats don't matter as much right?!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: tommo256 on November 09, 2014, 07:07:04 PM
All rounder, I still want bats that go well!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on November 09, 2014, 07:22:36 PM
All rounder, I still want bats that go well!

Nothing wrong with this!

I have far too much kit for an all-rounder... I just want the best kit so I can pretend I am still as good as I was in my early 20s! :D
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on November 09, 2014, 07:27:54 PM
After reading your excellent guide, I removed the scuff sheets from my new SSs and gave a modified version your process a go (minus the LV mallet as I don't own one).

I've done two bats so far and am pleased with the results.

After a healthy coat of Oil for each bat, I started off by rounding the edges on the bath. I felt this was better than going straight in with the mallet as it did the whole edge evenly (the same principal as Paul from IJC using the mallet handle to start rounding the edges.

I then started hitting the edges with my lighter mallet (369g), further compressing them. This made a sort of lip, the edge was compressed and the unknocked face was raised slightly higher.
Once this mallet was not compressing the edges any further I levelled out the face as best I could. As I had another heavier mallet to move on to this was a fairly rough job, but the bat was close enough to level before I moved on.

I then used my newly purchased Slazenger mallet/grip cone combo to finish the job. (638g with a longer handle, so more mallet speed!)
I bought this from Eclipse all sports for less than 3 and had planned to add weight to it. Anyway - back on topic...
I then went back to work on the edge, starting lightly then increasing the force with which I hit the bat, again until the mallet was no longer making any new indentations.
From there I rounded the toe as well, going until the bat started lightly feathering (which was after a surprising amount of rounding!)
With the edges and toe done I evened the face again. This time I gave the middle a good hard wack to use as a guideline. Once the face was perfectly even (as this was the final stage I was a bit more precise about finishing it nicely).

The final stage was to glue the newly feathered toe so it's not going anywhere (or getting any worse).
As I'm now happy these are both fully knocked in I will apply some shoo goo to the toe, and maybe apply a new scuff sheet (although I'm toying with leaving them natural and only having a scuff sheet on my match bat).

Thanks again for the detailed guide, and apologies for rambling on!  :)

I think the lignum vitae mallet issue here is a point of contention.

The only reason I have/use one is to cut down on the time it takes to mallet knock a bat.

It doesn't cut down on the time it takes to 'play in', nor does it fully protect the blade. I ALWAYS facesheet my bats - in my view, it is this which protects the blade, once the bat has been knocked in. It is a 50/50 protection process.

If you spend as much as I do on bats, better to be safe, than sorry!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on November 09, 2014, 07:41:20 PM
I think the lignum vitae mallet issue here is a point of contention.

The only reason I have/use one is to cut down on the time it takes to mallet knock a bat.

It doesn't cut down on the time it takes to 'play in', nor does it fully protect the blade. I ALWAYS facesheet my bats - in my view, it is this which protects the blade, once the bat has been knocked in. It is a 50/50 protection process.

If you spend as much as I do on bats, better to be safe, than sorry!

The 2 bats I've just finished are going to be my heavy net bat and a backup bat so if I scuff or not is yet to be decided.
Net bat I'm probably going to leave, I've just shoo gooed it so that's pretty much ready now for indoor nets.

The second one is a backup bat for match day/same weight as my match bat so may use in outdoor nets next season. Both these cost me sub 60 so I can afford not to scuff them but my OCD side is saying do it anyway!

And as far as the LV mallet goes I understand its purpose fully.
As I buy new bats every year for no reason one would probably benefit me, but I can't bring myself to spend that much on a mallet...
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on November 09, 2014, 07:45:29 PM
The 2 bats I've just finished are going to be my heavy net bat and a backup bat so if I scuff or not is yet to be decided.
Net bat I'm probably going to leave, I've just shoo gooed it so that's pretty much ready now for indoor nets.

The second one is a backup bat for match day/same weight as my match bat so may use in outdoor nets next season. Both these cost me sub 60 so I can afford not to scuff them but my OCD side is saying do it anyway!

And as far as the LV mallet goes I understand its purpose fully.
As I buy new bats every year for no reason one would probably benefit me, but I can't bring myself to spend that much on a mallet...

Agreed with the 60 thing - but when you have 6 bats which have RRPs between 250 and 600... better to be safe, then crying when the toe comes off one! lol!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on November 09, 2014, 07:55:12 PM
Agreed with the 60 thing - but when you have 6 bats which have RRPs between 250 and 600... better to be safe, then crying when the toe comes off one! lol!
I've only ever bought one bat for more than 200 and I was worried knocking it in, using it and storing it! I did t want it to break so using it to hit cricket balls was a nightmare lol!

My match bat is an SS LE that cost me 89.99 posted (2nd hand), that was sold ready to play, so naturally I refurbed it, knocked in more (better safe than sorry) and applied a new scuff sheet, might not be the most expensive bat in the world but that's getting the cotton wool treatment from me!

Don't get me wrong, I like to look after all my bats, but when they're bought cheaply to use against bat breakers in the net I can bear the thought of that one breaking rather than my more expensive match bat!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: TBONTB on November 09, 2014, 08:28:22 PM
About LV mallets, is it the weight that makes them so useful? or is it something intrinsic in the wood?

Hypothetically could I tape weight to one side of a mallet to weight it up to a kilo or so?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: The Palmist on November 09, 2014, 08:45:33 PM
I think there may be a market for your knocking in service
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: brokenbat on November 09, 2014, 11:28:38 PM
I agree about oiling / knocking in without the scuff sheet. But here's the next question: at the end of the season, do you remove the scuff sheet and then oil it during the winter? Or leave the sheet on?
Title: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on November 10, 2014, 12:44:27 AM
I think there may be a market for your knocking in service

Haha - I charge my mates 30 each for the privilege. None of them have moaned yet though!
Title: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on November 10, 2014, 12:51:26 AM
I agree about oiling / knocking in without the scuff sheet. But here's the next question: at the end of the season, do you remove the scuff sheet and then oil it during the winter? Or leave the sheet on?

That would depend on the bat itself. I would lightly oil/wax the bat again so it regains moisture lost DEPENDANT on the conditions the bat is kept in throughout the season and from what I can see.

I would say the most important thing, from what I have seen, is to make sure you do not oil in cracks and if you do oil it - make sure you let it dry for long enough. If you discard this, it can lift the wood. Make sure you have sealed the cracks with glue BEFORE OILING.

A bat is like anything made of high quality wood - you need to look after it if you want it to last.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: brokenbat on November 10, 2014, 03:30:04 PM
the debate stems from the view that once you oil a bat, and then apply a scuff sheet, the scuff sheet itself is adequate protection against the willow drying out. so, why remove the sheet? i am not sure what the truth is.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: ppccopener on November 10, 2014, 03:45:48 PM
Ginge has got most of this covered,dont worry broken bat just go with the flow. If not, :) :) you know what Mark Waugh said? classy middle order player from the 80's and always got runs against us(england)-in fact he got bucketfuls..

now...I appreciate he got his bats given to him,handed over in nicely packaged- perfect weight-not a mark on them...but he said:
'I take it out of the wrapper mate,go in the nets and smash the hell out of it for an hour and if it dont break in two mate I use it in the tests''

excuse the Aussie accent
 :) :)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on November 10, 2014, 06:40:40 PM

the debate stems from the view that once you oil a bat, and then apply a scuff sheet, the scuff sheet itself is adequate protection against the willow drying out. so, why remove the sheet? i am not sure what the truth is.

As I said, it will be circumstantial. It will vary bat by bat.

There is no definite answer here. Yes, usually you will be ok but some people want to make sure it has had a 'full' recondition before resheeting their beloved bat.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: brokenbat on November 29, 2014, 02:10:47 AM
what about the "playing in" part? do you go straight to nets, or vs the machine first?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on November 29, 2014, 08:26:17 AM

what about the "playing in" part? do you go straight to nets, or vs the machine first?

I always face a bowling machine but that is because I have access to one.

If you don't, facing a bowler is fine. Just make sure he uses a high quality but softer/used ball and leave any Yorkers alone - even if it means getting bowled.

If he uses a poor quality ball, you can crack the bat. Same goes for Yorkers to the toe.

Hope that helps!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: GarrettJ on November 29, 2014, 09:24:00 AM
Plastic scuff sheets are the devil, go au natural and regularly sand and oil
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on November 29, 2014, 09:35:59 AM

Plastic scuff sheets are the devil, go au natural and regularly sand and oil

Why?

I agree cheap ones are - but good ones are worth their weight in protecting the willow.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: brokenbat on November 30, 2014, 06:26:19 PM
Plastic scuff sheets are the devil, go au natural and regularly sand and oil

I tried this once. The problem is that repairing cracks is a major pain, and soon almost half the blade is covered with bat tape, running across the face. Unless you're advocating just letting surface cracks sit there?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Chad on November 30, 2014, 06:36:18 PM
Some say they dampen the performance, and prefer the 'feel' of an uncovered bat. I have no idea which one is right, but I do believe that scuff sheets help to keep performance for a bit longer, (As the impacts are dampened slightly, therefore damage to wood less) and definitely help preserve the bat itself. Entirely up to preference, I think some people just enjoy looking after their bats without scuff sheets, as it doesn't hide any cracks, and you can clean the bat regularly with an oil rag. (Loved doing this with my old Adidas Incurza)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on November 30, 2014, 06:43:31 PM
If I am paying 00s on a new bat, I'm protecting it for as long as possible.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Chad on November 30, 2014, 06:46:50 PM
If I am paying 00s on a new bat, I'm protecting it for as long as possible.

If others are paying 00s on a new bat, they are using it however they want. ;) If they believe that scuff sheets dampen performance, and buy the bat so they can score runs as effectively as possible, then I can totally see why they won't scuff! (Also, oiling and sanding is almost like a ritual for them at times!) Who doesn't love a bit of oil sometimes? :D
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on November 30, 2014, 06:49:02 PM
Oh don't get me wrong, when I didn't pay for my bats, I'd not use anti-scuff but now I have to pay full whack for bats, I do but as you say Chad, that's my preference.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Seniorplayer on November 30, 2014, 07:46:23 PM
Have stopped  using anti  scuff as IMO it as an effect on the bats performance.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: FvanN on November 30, 2014, 08:08:33 PM
Have stopped  using anti  scuff as IMO it as an effect on the bats performance.

Like you I too don't like scuff sheets but how do you quantify the difference in performance?  For me it seems to be the feel at impact but I can't say for sure I hit the ball a few extra meters further without a sheet  ???
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Seniorplayer on November 30, 2014, 08:19:18 PM
Like you I too don't like scuff sheets but how do you quantify the difference in performance?  For me it seems to be the feel at impact but I can't say for sure I hit the ball a few extra meters further without a sheet  ???

Well not exactly scientific but mallet and ball rebound off the middle of the  same bat with 1st anti scuff off then anti scuff on and then off again.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: seedy on November 30, 2014, 08:38:32 PM
Take it to the nets and smash some balls around. That normally works for me.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on November 30, 2014, 09:02:12 PM

Take it to the nets and smash some balls around. That normally works for me.

Ah... See, I have been going wrong with my preparation approach all along! :[
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: seedy on November 30, 2014, 09:19:13 PM
Just my approach mate everyone's different. Never had undue breakages or anything amiss happen so just keep doing what I've always done.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Buzz on December 01, 2014, 12:12:21 PM
Some say they dampen the performance, and prefer the 'feel' of an uncovered bat. I have no idea which one is right, but I do believe that scuff sheets help to keep performance for a bit longer, (As the impacts are dampened slightly, therefore damage to wood less) and definitely help preserve the bat itself. Entirely up to preference, I think some people just enjoy looking after their bats without scuff sheets, as it doesn't hide any cracks, and you can clean the bat regularly with an oil rag. (Loved doing this with my old Adidas Incurza)
I am under the impression that this is why the fibre scuff sheets are becoming more popular because of the feel of bat on ball.
Given the cost of bats now, making them last is important...
sanding, oiling etc is also very therapeutic!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: tim2000s on December 01, 2014, 12:22:27 PM
Based on the experience I've had with scuff sheets, it's possible to make a fibre one that is substantially thinner than a clear one but if I was doing that, I'd be sending the bat back to the manufacturer for a refurb, as those fibre sheets are unpleasant to remove.

I've always enjoyed keeping a bat scuff free, simply because that's the way I was initially brought up. I honestly don't believe there is a measurable difference in performance!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Kez on December 01, 2014, 01:51:18 PM
Have stopped  using anti  scuff as IMO it as an effect on the bats performance.
:( :o :(
Just my opinion here but what utter BS
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: FvanN on December 01, 2014, 02:15:06 PM
:( :o :(
Just my opinion here but what utter BS

Could the same not be said about your opinion  ???
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Kez on December 01, 2014, 02:18:51 PM
thats why its an opinion not a fact  :)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Chad on December 01, 2014, 02:57:43 PM
thats why its an opinion not a fact  :)

Well, my opinion of your opinion of his opinion is that it's an opinion based on no solid evidence. ;)

In all seriousness, I think that the dampening does happen, whether it is noticeable or not, well, I don't think I bat enough to notice, but most bats change over time, and bats are different, so it's hard to quantify it. Common sense does say that if you sheath anything, it dampens the feel, I'm sure @FattusCattus has pearls of wisdom to share on that subject!

Also, scuff sheets compress over use, so I'm a big believer of giving new bats their final 10-20 minutes of knocking AFTER the scuffing stage. Whether this makes a difference or not, I don't know, but just something I've always done since scuffing bats. (I think it stemmed from the Hammer Edge sheets, I always thought you had to give them some knocking after applying to seal them on properly and get the bat playing nicely)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: brokenbat on December 01, 2014, 03:01:28 PM
How do you guys avoid the problem of bat tape running across the face in multiple areas? This is the problem I come across when not using a sheet. One crack repair after another, and there is enough bat tape on the bat to form a scuff sheet !
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Buzz on December 01, 2014, 03:22:37 PM
How do you guys avoid the problem of bat tape running across the face in multiple areas? This is the problem I come across when not using a sheet. One crack repair after another, and there is enough bat tape on the bat to form a scuff sheet !
Most people on here don't use the bat enough for it to crack...!!   :o :o ??? :D
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on December 01, 2014, 03:29:14 PM
How do you guys avoid the problem of bat tape running across the face in multiple areas? This is the problem I come across when not using a sheet. One crack repair after another, and there is enough bat tape on the bat to form a scuff sheet !
Applying a scuff sheet helps  ;)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on December 01, 2014, 03:34:07 PM
Common sense does say that if you sheath anything, it dampens the feel,
Ultra light ones de-sensitise you less and feel more realistic.
Thicker ones are marketed as "ultra safe". They dampen the feeling more and naturally make you you last longer.
Textured ones just feel nicer.

Anyways, back to scuff sheets...
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Seniorplayer on December 01, 2014, 03:59:53 PM
:( :o :(
Just my opinion here but what utter BS

Not at all B.S its just  an opinion.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: GarrettJ on December 01, 2014, 04:14:27 PM
im with SENIORPLAYER ..... don't like scuff sheets at all.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: ppccopener on December 01, 2014, 05:21:27 PM
i'm sure someone will correct me if i'm wrong but shops and manufacturer's started selling bats with scuff sheets on when the 'pre-prepared/pre-knocked in' terms were used for buying a new bat.

Anyone, and i'm sure there are many here, who has tried to remove a scuff sheet from a used bat with know you can take half the wood with you if you are not careful,and they can be a pain in the backside.

I use them purely because I think it protects the bat from splitting and cracking-which I think it does. But 4 coats of linseed oil and a massive knocking in session could well do the same job?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: brokenbat on December 01, 2014, 05:28:09 PM
im with SENIORPLAYER ..... don't like scuff sheets at all.

i would dump scuff sheets if someone can show me how to maintain the bat without using bat tape on the face of the bat. any pics of your well used bats would help.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: SkipperJ on December 02, 2014, 05:30:55 PM
"This involves placing the spine of the bat on a hessian sheet, which offers plenty of protection against the floor, holding the handle. I then begin knocking the bat face in like a machine would, making sure the face is fully compacted and edges rounded "

Hey Ginger, how much padding do you use when knocking? Is there no compression of the spine / back of the bat? Could you share a picture of your setup?

I usually hold a bat in one hand and knock it in with the other. Of course this wears out my arms pretty quickly, and it is just a pain to keep the bat from twisting around.

Great guide btw!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: InternalTraining on December 02, 2014, 06:09:11 PM
I put two or three old pillows on my bed and knock the bat with my mallet. You want to keep one hand on the handle so that the bat remains flat when the mallet makes contact with it. This set up is the quickest and easiest way To make round dents  on the bat face without killing your arms. I have noticed that with bats that are pressed nicely, I don't have to do a lot of banging with the mallet.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Seniorplayer on December 02, 2014, 09:43:10 PM
i would dump scuff sheets if someone can show me how to maintain the bat without using bat tape on the face of the bat. any pics of your well used bats would help.

Once  As an experiment After applying linseed oil i applied two  light coats of Ronseal clear vanish to seal  the bat face this hardened the face and gave  it a shine without IMO affecting the  performance  of the blade it also made the face easy to clean then used the bat for a season without any problems.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: tim2000s on December 02, 2014, 10:02:19 PM
Once  As an experiment After applying linseed oil i applied two  light coats of Ronseal clear vanish to seal  the bat face this hardened the face and gave  it a shine without IMO affecting the  performance  of the blade it also made the face easy to clean then used the bat for a season without any problems.
In the old days,  that was called 'Polyarmour'  [emoji3]
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Boondougal on December 02, 2014, 10:06:59 PM
This whole topic on scuff sheets effecting performance really confuse's me. It's a really simple thing to get data on in controlled conditions. Surely a big brand like GM would have done some work to test this out. If it's not being pushed from a marketing perspective as a positive thing for the club cricketer. E.g factory fitted scuff sheets, all the performance all season long etc etc... Then I doubt the results are positive.

It would actually be a good sports science project... Contact Loughborough university and ask them if it would make a good project for a student. If it's not been done I bet it would actually make a decent dissertation.
Title: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Boondougal on December 02, 2014, 10:14:40 PM
Plus... Professionals operate at really fine margins of excellence. The difference a scuff sheet might make could effect those margins... Maybe. For the average club cricketer any difference, perceivable or not will be negligible relative to overall performance and no different than picking up a new or different bat.

I don't use them, just don't want to as I like to see the natural life of the wood. My instinct is if you feel that they impact performance then just that thought alone will be enough for you to be off your game if you were to use one.
So the best bet is to not. If the thought of your pride and joy getting damaged puts you off slashing outside off stump then get a scuff sheet on and swing like that baby is invincible!!!

Either way... It's all in the mind
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on December 02, 2014, 10:40:01 PM
I honestly don't think the performance is in any way effected, but I'll claim it next time I'm caught on the boundary!  ;)

I will go throught 2 or 3 scuff sheets a season, one through winter nets, a fresh one for the first game and then I might change it mid season if the sheet is marked too much for my liking.
I like a clean looking bat and I like a scuff sheet to help prolong the life. It's easier to rub marks off a scuff with white spirit than to sand a bat every weekend in my opinion.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Vitas Cricket on December 03, 2014, 01:34:38 AM
This whole topic on scuff sheets effecting performance really confuse's me. It's a really simple thing to get data on in controlled conditions. Surely a big brand like GM would have done some work to test this out. If it's not being pushed from a marketing perspective as a positive thing for the club cricketer. E.g factory fitted scuff sheets, all the performance all season long etc etc... Then I doubt the results are positive.

It would actually be a good sports science project... Contact Loughborough university and ask them if it would make a good project for a student. If it's not been done I bet it would actually make a decent dissertation.

The industry looks at it in the opposite way. Ie there is clear evidence to show that a scuff sheet prolongs the life of a bat dramatically. And a modern scuff sheet will have almost no impact on performance, if any at all. Older styles of scuff sheet may have dampened performance but in my opinion modern ones don't. Some people claim certain types of sheet actually enhance performance but that's total BS if you ask me. 

A good guide from Ginger. Not sure the triple mallet system is necessary. I use a lignum mallet and just increase the force used as i progress on the bat. It took time to alter my technique but i would never go back to a normal mallet now.
Title: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Boondougal on December 03, 2014, 01:47:39 AM
Yep personally I think I agree with you but reading back my post it feels a little more negative to brands. After all cricket retailers probably get way more hassle from cracks and natural damage than they do regarding "performance" so a scuff sheet is sensible.

Back on topic I realised I forget to say the guide was spot on... And I followed it recently pretty closely on a recent purchase.

I don't have all the mallets but the guide was a great reference.

Really appreciate it when people share real life practical skills.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Vitas Cricket on December 03, 2014, 09:55:15 AM
Yep personally I think I agree with you but reading back my post it feels a little more negative to brands. After all cricket retailers probably get way more hassle from cracks and natural damage than they do regarding "performance" so a scuff sheet is sensible.

Back on topic I realised I forget to say the guide was spot on... And I followed it recently pretty closely on a recent purchase.

I don't have all the mallets but the guide was a great reference.

Really appreciate it when people share real life practical skills.

The number of parents who come to me with a bat that has sustained a small surface crack that they find 'unacceptable' as the bat is 'only a few weeks old' is frustrating. Especially as they demand a replacement, despite me offering a free repair myself or the option to send to the manufacturer for a repair - no chance of them saying 'oh this bat is stuffed we will replace it.'

If a hockey stick or a tennis racket etc sustains damage early in its life then yes it should probably be replaced. A cricket bat is made of wood, it was once alive and growing out of the ground. During normal use It will naturally sustain minor damage. A scuff sheet is the best way to reduce the risk.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on December 03, 2014, 10:15:41 AM
The number of parents who come to me with a bat that has sustained a small surface crack that they find 'unacceptable' as the bat is 'only a few weeks old' is frustrating. Especially as they demand a replacement, despite me offering a free repair myself or the option to send to the manufacturer for a repair - no chance of them saying 'oh this bat is stuffed we will replace it.'

If a hockey stick or a tennis racket etc sustains damage early in its life then yes it should probably be replaced. A cricket bat is made of wood, it was once alive and growing out of the ground. During normal use It will naturally sustain minor damage. A scuff sheet is the best way to reduce the risk.

Did a mid season refurb on a spartan for a teammate last season.
One of the grains had "opened up" perfectly, and there were a couple of small surface cracks under the scuff sheet.

As it was "broken" he borrowed a bat of mine and left it with me.
I repaired it, but as the crack was still visible (if you knew it was there, at a glance you couldn't tell) it was to his mind still broken.
Because of this he took it back to the shop he'd bought it from who had a look and said "it's a bit of wood, they do that, it's fine"
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Seniorplayer on December 03, 2014, 11:47:50 AM
The number of parents who come to me with a bat that has sustained a small surface crack that they find 'unacceptable' as the bat is 'only a few weeks old' is frustrating. Especially as they demand a replacement, despite me offering a free repair myself or the option to send to the manufacturer for a repair - no chance of them saying 'oh this bat is stuffed we will replace it.'

If a hockey stick or a tennis racket etc sustains damage early in its life then yes it should probably be replaced. A cricket bat is made of wood, it was once alive and growing out of the ground. During normal use It will naturally sustain minor damage. A scuff sheet is the best way to reduce the risk.
with regard to bats cracking
The general bat buying public have a lack of understanding regarding the natural process of quality willow.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Chad on December 03, 2014, 08:56:50 PM
with regard to bats cracking
The general bat buying public have a lack of understanding regarding the natural process of quality willow.

When my Kook Genesis had a crack on its edge, thanks to someone hitting out catches and top edging one, I brought it back to the shop and asked for a return. They just told me that it was completely superficial, and that cracks will happen from time to time. (Was quite a deep one) Now that I look back to it, I must have looked like a right plonker, but didn't try to argue and just took what they said. (Made sense to my limited brain then, if you hit a hard ball with a bit of wood, it's eventually going to crack a bit)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: brokenbat on December 15, 2014, 04:03:39 AM
More than compromising ping, I think the bigger issue with scuff sheets is the extra weight. I took one off the other day, and noticed much better pickup without it!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: skip1973 on December 15, 2014, 04:22:50 AM
Yeah that's right, they weigh a ton and reduce ping, that's why all the test guys use them.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on December 15, 2014, 07:26:59 AM

Yeah that's right, they weigh a ton and reduce ping, that's why all the test guys use them.

Sarcastic much!? Lol! ;)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Andythomo21 on December 15, 2014, 08:27:26 AM
If you always remove the scuff sheets before preparation and knocking in, why did you order them from John with scuff sheets on Ginger?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on December 15, 2014, 09:18:21 AM

If you always remove the scuff sheets before preparation and knocking in, why did you order them from John with scuff sheets on Ginger?

Quite simply, I didn't.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Andythomo21 on December 15, 2014, 09:51:43 AM
You mean you didn't order them with scuff sheets on, that's just how they were sent? Just on your photos the bat you havnt knocked in has a scuff sheet on.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on December 15, 2014, 09:53:41 AM
I didn't ask for them to be put on - they were sent that way. I removed them for the knocking process.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: sarg on March 04, 2015, 12:56:26 AM
After persistence with my puny mallets I took the plunge and purchased a LV Mallet from Les at Elviar's Shed via ebay and it is awesome! Les was very easy to deal with and the transaction went very smoothly.

 Its a Hercules model and is 825 grams. The mallet head itself is flatter on one side which is great for finishing.

 I was surprised at how much extra knocking a few recent purchases needed.
Went for a long handle and it makes a good counterbalance when holding it higher making delicate edge rounding easy or toe area work easy.

Can't recommend getting your bat knocked in with a LV enough if you want a really strong. Anyone need this done in Adelaide Aus, let me know.

(http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/15/03/03/9f82cff28f5bd2c263880545ce8d032c.jpg)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Wickets-then-runs on March 04, 2015, 09:16:20 AM
How much did that cost you, Sarg? With the amount of bats I go through, this may be a wise investment...
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Stuey on March 04, 2015, 11:11:38 AM
@ Gingerbusiness reading your initial post makes me wonder how many clubbies are throwing/giving away or just retiring bats that look well used to the naked eye but are infact in their prime. I know this used to be me, foolishly thinking a nice white blade was the way forward. I have a trusty Fusion in my bag 5 grains, 5 or 6 seasons old, my team mates can't believe i still use it, but at only 2Ib7 (reduced) it goes like the clappers, a bit of sanding and oiling at the beginning and end of seasons sees it ready for the next. I'm just getting to work on my new Red Ink, following your process.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: sarg on March 04, 2015, 12:51:25 PM

How much did that cost you, Sarg? With the amount of bats I go through, this may be a wise investment...
$A130.
He does also does heavy Oak mallets for half that, but you can just tell the San Paolo LV is much harder and a full swing is unnecessary. You just let the weight of the mallet head do the work.
I was half concerned it wasn't worth it, but not since I retapped all my recent purchases.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Gingerbusiness on March 04, 2015, 05:27:10 PM

@ Gingerbusiness reading your initial post makes me wonder how many clubbies are throwing/giving away or just retiring bats that look well used to the naked eye but are infact in their prime. I know this used to be me, foolishly thinking a nice white blade was the way forward. I have a trusty Fusion in my bag 5 grains, 5 or 6 seasons old, my team mates can't believe i still use it, but at only 2Ib7 (reduced) it goes like the clappers, a bit of sanding and oiling at the beginning and end of seasons sees it ready for the next. I'm just getting to work on my new Red Ink, following your process.

I am telling you, knocking in thoroughly is the way to go.

I recently just sold my Red Ink. It brought tears to my eyes when I did however because John had softly pressed it, it gave me the opportunity to give it a proper knock.

By the time I had finished, it was very pingy and ready to go.

Knocking in properly is the way to go for performance and longevity!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: nottinghamtiger on March 04, 2015, 05:42:43 PM
I recently just sold my Red Ink. It brought tears to my eyes when I did however because John had softly pressed it, it gave me the opportunity to give it a proper knock.

By the time I had finished, it was very pingy and ready to go.

It's gone to a good new home with someone who will appreciate it though, and appreciate not having to knock it in themselves!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: i12breakfree on March 04, 2015, 06:25:04 PM
Its time for CBF custom bat mallets - butterfly ones being the heavier one and will last long  ;)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: noelfitz99 on March 31, 2015, 08:47:39 PM
Is oil a necessity ?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on March 31, 2015, 09:15:49 PM
Is oil a necessity ?

Some say no, some say yes.

The argument for is that it seals the moisture in and increases the longevity of the bat, while others say that it adds weight and deadens the performance.

Personally I always oil by new bats (my most recent purchase having one good coat all over, a light coat on the face, a scuff sheet applied then two very light coats on the exposed willow)
It may soften the timber slightly, but if you're knocking the bat in anyway this won't cause any issues (you'll just need to give the bat a bit more mallet loving)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: noelfitz99 on March 31, 2015, 10:20:09 PM
Some say no, some say yes.

The argument for is that it seals the moisture in and increases the longevity of the bat, while others say that it adds weight and deadens the performance.

Personally I always oil by new bats (my most recent purchase having one good coat all over, a light coat on the face, a scuff sheet applied then two very light coats on the exposed willow)
It may soften the timber slightly, but if you're knocking the bat in anyway this won't cause any issues (you'll just need to give the bat a bit more mallet loving)

I've knocked my bat in for 2 hours. I want to play with it tomorrow , do you think that's alright even though 3-4 hours was recommended
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on March 31, 2015, 10:57:10 PM
How hard were you knocking it in mate? If you started gently I'd personally suggest spending a bit longer than you have to ensure it's ready to play. If you started firmly and have got it to a stage where you can't easily indent it with the mallet any more then it should be okay to use.

I managed to get a GN Powerbow "playable" for a team mate with 2 hours knocking in last season. It was safe for use against a hard ball (not brand new but he bats in the middle order) but if it had been mine (and I wasn't given it on Friday night and told "get this ready for tomorrow") I'd have preferred to spend maybe another hour or so on it, just because you can't over prepare a bat but you can under prepare one.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: TOGS on April 01, 2015, 12:34:07 PM
A wee bit off topic maybe but on the subject of toes...
Does anyone agree that a layer of glue on the toe is as good as applying a toe?
If not better..??
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: sarg on April 01, 2015, 12:47:11 PM
Hmmm. Not a good idea. skip to 9 m 44 s.

http://youtu.be/Z_e3AFndzmM
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on April 01, 2015, 12:58:32 PM
Shoe goo - yes
PVA or wood Varnish work well but need regular re-application

Resin based glue no (as above)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: brokenbat on April 01, 2015, 01:57:34 PM
I tried mixing PVA glue with shoo goo (instead of using water, as per JM's suggestion), and the result was awesome.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: TOGS on April 01, 2015, 02:15:43 PM
Thanks guys.
Is nobody applying bat toes these days then?
They certainly are at production, nearly all the branded (& other) bats I get in these days come with toes applied.
Made for the Scottish climate I always thought :(
Shoe Goo the in-thing then??
Would make life easier too.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on April 01, 2015, 02:21:45 PM

Is nobody applying bat toes these days then? I would if they weren't such a pain to do

They certainly are at production, nearly all the branded (& other) bats I get in these days come with toes applied. If the option is provided I always ask for one as I think they're practical and look nicer than my DIY alternatives

Shoe Goo the in-thing then?? It's a forum thing I think, never seen anyone else do it. Makes it nice and easy though

Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: uknsaunders on April 01, 2015, 06:43:15 PM
Thanks guys.
Is nobody applying bat toes these days then?
They certainly are at production, nearly all the branded (& other) bats I get in these days come with toes applied.
Made for the Scottish climate I always thought :(
Shoe Goo the in-thing then??
Would make life easier too.

1. They add a tiny amount of weight (that's a forum thing)
2. They fall off after 2 nets without fail
3. The are a pain to apply
4. Linseed Oil is cheaper , lighter an does as good a job

and most importantly...

5. If they stay on and you crack the toe, you'll never know until the bat splits in half
and even if you see the crack
6. It then proves a right pain in the (No Swearing Please) to take off and leaves gunk all over the toe that needs cleaning up

I'm not even sure they stop damp getting into the bat toe area!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: smilley792 on April 01, 2015, 06:50:35 PM
It's amazing how easy toe guards come off. I can usually kill.onw in 2 indoor games........

but

When I wanted to remove one from a toro I acquired.  Dam near hardest thing I've ever had to remove!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Seniorplayer on April 01, 2015, 07:25:22 PM
I use Hammerite  damproof paint long lasting works a treat repelling water.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: TOGS on April 01, 2015, 10:40:31 PM
Sounds like bat toes are here for the short innings then?
Just after me buying 12 sheets of Phillip's Stick-a-sole last season :(
And each sheet big enough to toe a hunderd bats :(
An investment in a tin of damp-proof paint sounds like it would have been more profitable.
This forum could save me loads of dosh!!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on April 01, 2015, 10:53:53 PM
Sounds like bat toes are here for the short innings then?
Just after me buying 12 sheets of Phillip's Stick-a-sole last season :(
And each sheet big enough to toe a hunderd bats :(
An investment in a tin of damp-proof paint sounds like it would have been more profitable.
This forum could save me loads of dosh!!

That's not how it usually works round here, you end up spending a small fortune on all kinds of kit that you definitely don't need rather than saving money!  :D
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Seniorplayer on April 02, 2015, 09:30:46 AM
That's not how it usually works round here, you end up spending a small fortune on all kinds of kit that you definitely don't need rather than saving money!  :D


Agree with that I am back up to 5 bats 4 pairs  of pads 5pairs of gloves 5 bags 7 pairs of shoes 6 helmets  7 under armour 9 caps and countless shirts and trousers no wonder I can never find what I am after in my kit cupboard.








Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Neon Cricket on April 02, 2015, 10:13:47 AM
6 helmets and 7 pairs of shoes is impressive for anyone haha
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on April 02, 2015, 10:21:47 AM
6 helmets and 7 pairs of shoes is impressive for anyone haha

It makes my 4 pairs of shoes and 3 helmets look moderate so I'm happy lol  :D
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: SkipperJ on April 03, 2015, 05:48:13 PM
I use Hammerite  damproof paint long lasting works a treat repelling water.
Was that an April Fools joke or you serious?  ???
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: tejasapatel on April 03, 2015, 06:08:22 PM

Agree with that I am back up to 5 bats 4 pairs  of pads 5pairs of gloves 5 bags 7 pairs of shoes 6 helmets  7 under armour 9 caps and countless shirts and trousers no wonder I can never find what I am after in my kit cupboard.

You seem to have more gear than most of my team combined.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on April 03, 2015, 06:10:21 PM
You seem to have more gear than most of my team combined.

5 bats between 11 players? #Village  ;)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: tejasapatel on April 03, 2015, 06:14:26 PM
5 bats between 11 players? #Village  ;)

Being on the forum for a while. I have 5 bats, two helmets, two set of gloves and 2 sets of pads.  But having 6 helmets and 5 bags puts you ahead of 50% of the team combined.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: jwebber86 on April 03, 2015, 06:27:57 PM
I have got carried away recently and now I have 8 bats 3 helmets 6 pair of gloves 3 pairs of pads 5 pairs of boots and countless other bits. This doesn't include all the stuff I want to get rid of
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: tejasapatel on April 03, 2015, 07:45:45 PM

I have got carried away recently and now I have 8 bats 3 helmets 6 pair of gloves 3 pairs of pads 5 pairs of boots and countless other bits. This doesn't include all the stuff I want to get rid of

It's the forum effect. Not many are immune to the for sale and eBay bargains threads.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Seniorplayer on April 06, 2015, 07:43:09 PM
Was that an April Fools joke or you serious?  ???

Dead serious wouldn't use anything else.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: jazz15c on April 07, 2015, 11:54:15 AM
I honestly don't think the performance is in any way effected, but I'll claim it next time I'm caught on the boundary!  ;)

I will go throught 2 or 3 scuff sheets a season, one through winter nets, a fresh one for the first game and then I might change it mid season if the sheet is marked too much for my liking.
I like a clean looking bat and I like a scuff sheet to help prolong the life. It's easier to rub marks off a scuff with white spirit than to sand a bat every weekend in my opinion.

I see the use of a scuff-sheet on a bat in the same way I do the case on my mobile phone...

Yes, it looks beautiful completely naked and without the protection. But do I trust myself not to scratch/dent/scuff it? Absolutely not.  ;)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: liscon12 on May 28, 2015, 07:37:10 PM
So I'm knocking in a bat and cracks start appearing along the grain lines and I can feel these cracks, is this good or should I oil the bat again and continue a couple days later? (this is my first time knocking in a bat from scratch)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Chad on May 28, 2015, 08:15:14 PM
So I'm knocking in a bat and cracks start appearing along the grain lines and I can feel these cracks, is this good or should I oil the bat again and continue a couple days later? (this is my first time knocking in a bat from scratch)

Give it a light sand, clean off all of the sanding dust then give it a light light oil. Leave overnight, then resume with the knocking.

Or just leave that bit until you've finished knocking in, the bat is going to crack up anyways, so I wouldn't worry too much about it until you've finished the job. Would probably recommend going a bit lighter with the mallet then building up the strike power. All depends on how bad and deep they are to be honest, I would probably knock in the surrounding areas to try level off the grains first before sanding!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: liscon12 on May 28, 2015, 08:48:10 PM
The crack isn't that bad, I'm gonna sand a little and go a bit gentler with the mallet
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: sarg on May 29, 2015, 06:11:22 AM

The crack isn't that bad, I'm gonna sand a little and go a bit gentler with the mallet

Gasp...not the Master! Said mine was soft just yesterday. Light tapping is all mine will take atm. Sell it to me for 30[emoji12]
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: liscon12 on May 29, 2015, 09:13:29 AM
You're ok @sarg haha I've gone a little easier on her and the cracks are flattening out and no longer noticeable, nice try though  :D
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: sarg on May 29, 2015, 10:29:24 AM

You're ok @sarg haha I've gone a little easier on her and the cracks are flattening out and no longer noticeable, nice try though  :D

Only kidding. Glad to hear its only minor.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: sanredrose on June 01, 2015, 11:20:32 PM
@Gingerbusiness

Any chance of a youtube video with your knocking in process ? I have a oak mallet from elvis art which weighs rougly 700 grams. Is this closer to LV mallet or is it just the heavier version of GN mallet ?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: sarg on June 02, 2015, 10:11:52 AM
Not as hard as LV, but Les's mallets are quality. The weight in that mallet will do a good job.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Kulli on June 02, 2015, 11:11:21 AM
is he still selling them on ebay, or just by direct contact?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: TangoWhiskey on June 02, 2015, 11:39:49 AM
Sounds like bat toes are here for the short innings then?
Just after me buying 12 sheets of Phillip's Stick-a-sole last season :(
And each sheet big enough to toe a hunderd bats :(
An investment in a tin of damp-proof paint sounds like it would have been more profitable.
This forum could save me loads of dosh!!

I prefer a toe guard. I think it gives more protection against the yorker too.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: sanredrose on June 02, 2015, 05:43:50 PM
is he still selling them on ebay, or just by direct contact?


I bought this mallet about 3 months ago. Just did a quick check on eBay and he is still selling them ...

Oak mallet 0.75 kg

http://www.ebay.com/itm/professional-Cricket-Bat-Knocking-In-Mallet-Solid-Oak-Approx-700g/121663200162?_trksid=p2047675.c100009.m1982&_trkparms=aid%3D777000%26algo%3DABA.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D31356%26meid%3Df0a294e919654c659e2a939a979bf307%26pid%3D100009%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D1%26sd%3D111666972097 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/professional-Cricket-Bat-Knocking-In-Mallet-Solid-Oak-Approx-700g/121663200162?_trksid=p2047675.c100009.m1982&_trkparms=aid%3D777000%26algo%3DABA.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D31356%26meid%3Df0a294e919654c659e2a939a979bf307%26pid%3D100009%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D1%26sd%3D111666972097)

LV mallet 1 kg

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Professional-Cricket-Bat-Knocking-In-Mallet-Lignum-Vitae-Approx-1Kg/111666972097?_trksid=p2047675.c100009.m1982&_trkparms=aid%3D777000%26algo%3DABA.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D31356%26meid%3D00c65ad73950492094a4b1cc0187fd07%26pid%3D100009%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D1%26sd%3D121663200162 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Professional-Cricket-Bat-Knocking-In-Mallet-Lignum-Vitae-Approx-1Kg/111666972097?_trksid=p2047675.c100009.m1982&_trkparms=aid%3D777000%26algo%3DABA.MBE%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D31356%26meid%3D00c65ad73950492094a4b1cc0187fd07%26pid%3D100009%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D1%26sd%3D121663200162)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: abdulwq on June 06, 2015, 09:23:31 PM
Hello mates, just a quick question.
how would you know when the bat is ready?
I have been using the wide grainer H4L for last three months with scuff sheet on after knocking it softly for some hours.After good amount of playing and avoiding yorkers when i started smashing the ball and felt very confident of bat performance the bottom edge suffered a surface crack though i could not justify if its deep or just a t surface. Anyway a friend sanded it for me glued it a bit and wrapped nylon string on toe.
Unfotunately the scuff sheet on edges stretched and swelled so i took it of very easily with min fibers of willow coming off. Sanded face and applied two light coats of oil n let it be for a week.
Since last week i have started to hit it quite hard with mallet and now the grains of the willow seems like opening like this in the picture.
Is the bat on the verge  of its peak????
(http://i453.photobucket.com/albums/qq256/abdulwq80/knocking_zpsuhqz2bxv.jpg) (http://s453.photobucket.com/user/abdulwq80/media/knocking_zpsuhqz2bxv.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: rickjames on January 30, 2016, 11:00:03 PM
Evening all.

So I've given my B3 two coats of oil since Thursday and have left it 24 hours to dry, so I guess it's mallet time. With regards to rounding the edges, how long do you normally spend on doing it? I might be blind but looking at it now it looks fairly rounded already
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: well past my peak on January 30, 2016, 11:11:59 PM
I know everyone has their own way of doing in, what I find works for me and convenient is I just roiled edges using a rolling pin should only take 5 mins max. I roll the edges maybe another two times over the coming days so all up 15mins, obviously the amount of time spent on knocking in bats varies on the individual bat my last B3 1271 was not a long process and opened up pretty quickly.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: rickjames on January 30, 2016, 11:15:06 PM
Cheers! I was gonna use the mallet but I'll dig out the rolling pin
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Number4 on January 31, 2016, 12:05:59 AM
Cheers! I was gonna use the mallet but I'll dig out the rolling pin

As I said before I use the edge of the bath tub and it works brilliantly... Never had an edge crack yet
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Number4 on January 31, 2016, 12:06:53 AM
Hello mates, just a quick question.
how would you know when the bat is ready?
I have been using the wide grainer H4L for last three months with scuff sheet on after knocking it softly for some hours.After good amount of playing and avoiding yorkers when i started smashing the ball and felt very confident of bat performance the bottom edge suffered a surface crack though i could not justify if its deep or just a t surface. Anyway a friend sanded it for me glued it a bit and wrapped nylon string on toe.
Unfotunately the scuff sheet on edges stretched and swelled so i took it of very easily with min fibers of willow coming off. Sanded face and applied two light coats of oil n let it be for a week.
Since last week i have started to hit it quite hard with mallet and now the grains of the willow seems like opening like this in the picture.
Is the bat on the verge  of its peak????
([url]http://i453.photobucket.com/albums/qq256/abdulwq80/knocking_zpsuhqz2bxv.jpg[/url]) ([url]http://s453.photobucket.com/user/abdulwq80/media/knocking_zpsuhqz2bxv.jpg.html[/url])


What are you oiling it with? Tar?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Woodyspin on January 31, 2016, 12:30:21 AM
As I said before I use the edge of the bath tub and it works brilliantly... Never had an edge crack yet
How do you do this?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Number4 on January 31, 2016, 02:17:24 AM
Just put the edge of the bat on the rounded edge of the bath tub, apply moderate downward pressure and slide the bat back and forth along the edge
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: brokenbat on January 31, 2016, 02:29:23 AM
you can even use a grip cone. just hold the bat in one hand, cone in the other - and start "rolling" the edge with the cone.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: InternalTraining on January 31, 2016, 05:26:22 AM
@abdulwq , I suspect your bat is starting to delaminate.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: sarg on January 31, 2016, 10:40:13 AM
Old bloke, Bob, i met has been rolling bats in Adelaide  for players including state for 50 years, not knocking. Rolling the edges and the face. Puts the bat in a vice and uses a 4x2 of hardwood of some type. Bat has to be well oiled to do it. Only does the playing area.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: rickjames on January 31, 2016, 02:16:26 PM
Me again.

Spent an hour and a half or so on/off doing knocking in the edges, would you say from these that they've had enough treatment? Running my fingers along it would seem to suggest so, but what with this being new to me a second opinion doesn't hurt...

(http://i.imgur.com/ubPTjvU.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/697t9SW.jpg)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Centurion on January 31, 2016, 02:33:17 PM
Looks pretty good to me


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: rickjames on January 31, 2016, 02:36:55 PM
Thanks; I'd say the right handers outside edge feels slightly more rounded, or if anything looks far more prominent due to the heartwood. Spent about 30/40 minutes on each at varying speeds, this is killing my hands, ha.

Onto the toe...
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: rickjames on January 31, 2016, 04:15:23 PM
Right, thrown a ball onto the toe pretty hard and can't see any seam marks, so I assume we're all good there.

Although with my first ten minutes of knocking in the face it appears to be undentable, not sure what to make of that?!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: brokenbat on January 31, 2016, 04:30:21 PM
Most bat faces generally won't need much work. Just focus on bottom six inches and edges.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: rickjames on January 31, 2016, 04:36:30 PM
Edges are 100% done and so's the toe. Again, can't make any visible indentations on it either...
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on January 31, 2016, 05:43:37 PM
Don't B3s all come with their "Ready Press" so they're good to go out the packet now, anyway?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: rickjames on January 31, 2016, 05:59:01 PM
Don't suppose you're able to confirm @procricket B3 ?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: dcullen8 on January 31, 2016, 05:59:16 PM
That's a 25 optional extra

Sent from my LG-D855 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on January 31, 2016, 06:24:05 PM
That's a 25 optional extra

Sent from my LG-D855 using Tapatalk

I thought ready press was standard and then being additionally knocked in with a mallet and having a scuff sheet applied was the 25 optional extra.

@procricket B3 please help lol  :-[
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: smilley792 on January 31, 2016, 06:27:06 PM
I've rounded edges and knocked in toe. But never touched the middle on a b3 yet.


The butterflies I didn't even bother rounding the edges.

No issues on any off them in terms of cracks or seam marks.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: dcullen8 on January 31, 2016, 06:27:33 PM
Ahh maybe that is the case then

Sent from my LG-D855 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: anony on April 05, 2016, 08:51:41 PM
I picked up a new bat last week after deciding to get back into the game for the first time since i was a teen. I'm a couple of hours into knocking it in and I'm starting to see a few very tiny fibres on the face of the bat. Should I give it a light sand and another thin oiling? I'm not able to make any new indentations on the bat, would this suggest it is ready for a session in the nets?

Also, what is meant when people say the grains are 'opening up'? Is it a feel thing or something visual?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Buzz on April 05, 2016, 08:58:15 PM
Welcome to the forum. I hope your bank balance is ready for the beating you will give it on equipment over the next few months!

The phrase opening up refers to slight cracks appearing vertically along the grains.
You should have scored about 750 plus runs with the bat by that point!!
It is a horribly overused phrase on here (especially as most people on here only use the bat for about 2 innings before deciding it isn't the one and using something else!!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: anony on April 05, 2016, 09:33:59 PM
Welcome to the forum. I hope your bank balance is ready for the beating you will give it on equipment over the next few months!

Thank you :) I'm preemptively applying for new, better paying jobs in that case!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: WalkingWicket37 on April 05, 2016, 10:21:10 PM
It's not the easiest thing in the world to photograph, but here is a bat I'd say (in my non-expert opinion) is just starting to open up

(http://i1206.photobucket.com/albums/bb450/CPye061194/20160405_230716_zpsyywik2pr.jpg) (http://s1206.photobucket.com/user/CPye061194/media/20160405_230716_zpsyywik2pr.jpg.html)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: anony on April 06, 2016, 03:09:48 PM
Any ideas on the fibres I am seeing on the bat face? They seem to be mainly on the grain boundaries. Is the face too dry I wonder?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Neon Cricket on April 06, 2016, 03:14:09 PM
@anony - that's the bat 'opening up' as Cam says, it's a good sign! Nothing bad at all.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: raza147 on April 06, 2016, 03:21:24 PM
vertical cracks down the grains are a very good sign, for my bats it means they are probably at their peak performance
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: sunny_Kris on June 23, 2016, 03:06:14 AM
Welcome to the forum. I hope your bank balance is ready for the beating you will give it on equipment over the next few months!

 No one warned me this would happen. And before i knew it, i had 4 bats!  ;)

 @anony : True dat, buddy!
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: liscon12 on February 25, 2017, 11:22:49 PM
I know this is Gingers guide but @sarg has made a good video on YouTube showing how he knocks bats in

https://youtu.be/AkkBpC6ff60
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: sarg on February 26, 2017, 12:57:33 AM
I know this is Gingers guide but @sarg has made a good video on YouTube showing how he knocks bats in

https://youtu.be/AkkBpC6ff60

thanks @liscon12. With so many players in Austrlaia buying post christmas bats, including two myself, I thought it would help them. There are a couple of things missing and some jibes at myths left on the 'cutting room floor'. Won't cure laziness or that 'I want to use it in the finals rush'.

The Camera did its own thing with focus. Ive been using the smartphone for so long i have forgotten how to use the camera. need to relearn how to use it.
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: Calzehbhoy on June 18, 2017, 08:24:03 PM
If people are looking for a decent quality heavy and cheap mallet I can recommend the below one. It's been a revelation compared to my old Kookaburra one of roughly the same cost.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/302334844383  (https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/302334844383)
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: t2ylo on June 18, 2017, 08:29:34 PM
If people are looking for a decent quality heavy and cheap mallet I can recommend the below one. It's been a revelation compared to my old Kookaburra one of roughly the same cost.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/302334844383  (https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/302334844383)

Also got one. Also highly recommend
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: alee on September 08, 2017, 10:23:59 PM
Hi,

Does a harder press bat need more knocking in or a softer one?
Title: Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
Post by: InternalTraining on September 23, 2017, 12:40:13 PM
#knockingtips
#knockingprocess
#knocking