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Author Topic: Ginger's Knocking In Process  (Read 27059 times)

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sl1988

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #30 on: November 02, 2014, 09:39:26 AM »

ok, been reading this thread to get some advice as I'm knocking in my new bat atm. ok I have a question - what exactly does linseed oil do? Does it actually seal the moisture in? or does just create a very soft boundary layer which is more susceptible to knocks etc? in that case would it not be detrimental to performance? as the whole point of knocking in is to create a hard crust and the linseed oil does the opposite? would love to hear your thoughts
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Gingerbusiness

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #31 on: November 02, 2014, 10:04:54 AM »

Morning.

Linseed oil is used for two key reasons;

1. Keeps moisture out of the bat during use, which can cause the wood to become brittle

2. Allow the wood to be safely knocked in - reducing the risk of cracking during the process
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sl1988

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #32 on: November 02, 2014, 10:13:52 AM »

thanks for the quick reply.

Isn't wood very porous anyway? i.e. ive just read some threads saying laver and woods gain weight after coming to England regardless whether they are oiled etc. so wouldn't this whole sealing in the moisture thing be an old wives tale?

I agree on number 2. However wouldn't having a scuff sheet do the same thing by holding the fibres together? plus it would not soften the willow which in turn should increase performance?

might be completely wrong but just my thinking on the whole matter!
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Gingerbusiness

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #33 on: November 02, 2014, 10:21:02 AM »

1. Wood is porous but the oil stops water-based moisture getting into the wood, lifting it.

2. Yes. You can just use a scuff sheet. However in my opinion, knocking in usually destroys scuff sheets around the edges.
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Seniorplayer

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #34 on: November 02, 2014, 10:32:46 AM »

Raw linseed oil ( flax oil) on the face  ( and toe to prevent damp) nourishes the willow as it soaks in.
It also retains the moisture already in the wood which is essential especially with a new bat which should have been made with the willow at the correct moisture content which is achieved by air and or kiln drying.
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tim2000s

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #35 on: November 02, 2014, 10:41:37 AM »

The other point to bear in mind about linseed is that it aids the wood fibres binding together as you knock it in. Even though it might not seem it,  it is definitely a good thing.
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Gingerbusiness

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #36 on: November 02, 2014, 10:43:29 AM »


The other point to bear in mind about linseed is that it aids the wood fibres binding together as you knock it in. Even though it might not seem it,  it is definitely a good thing.

Very true Tim :)
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sl1988

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #37 on: November 02, 2014, 12:20:31 PM »

thanks for the advice guys!

another quick question - going a bit off topic here. Helicopter scuff sheet or hammer edge? Thinking of getting these off bulldog but i'm not decided which one! If I get the helicopter I can get them to any length any cover the whole blade (even over the stickers) + they are clear I think. Hammer edge is translucent but a lot stiffer so less of a performance hit?
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Gingerbusiness

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #38 on: November 02, 2014, 12:22:17 PM »

Helicopter for me.
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WalkingWicket37

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #39 on: November 02, 2014, 12:41:56 PM »

thanks for the advice guys!

another quick question - going a bit off topic here. Helicopter scuff sheet or hammer edge? Thinking of getting these off bulldog but i'm not decided which one! If I get the helicopter I can get them to any length any cover the whole blade (even over the stickers) + they are clear I think. Hammer edge is translucent but a lot stiffer so less of a performance hit?
Helicopter looks nicer and is easier to apply.
As far as performance, the difference is so minute it doesn't matter!

Personally I prefer helicopter as I can cover up to the embossed part of the stickers so there's no part of the face exposed, whereas the hammer edge are pre cut so you have to work with what you've got.
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joeljonno

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #40 on: November 03, 2014, 02:47:59 PM »

Here's how I do my bats....

Let my two year old do it for me.

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TBONTB

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #41 on: November 03, 2014, 02:54:25 PM »

No need to put in a machine. Just give a child a mallet and red bull let them go mad for a few hours bobs your uncle. New business right there!
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WalkingWicket37

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #42 on: November 09, 2014, 05:58:54 PM »

After reading your excellent guide, I removed the scuff sheets from my new SSs and gave a modified version your process a go (minus the LV mallet as I don't own one).

I've done two bats so far and am pleased with the results.

After a healthy coat of Oil for each bat, I started off by rounding the edges on the bath. I felt this was better than going straight in with the mallet as it did the whole edge evenly (the same principal as Paul from IJC using the mallet handle to start rounding the edges.

I then started hitting the edges with my lighter mallet (369g), further compressing them. This made a sort of lip, the edge was compressed and the unknocked face was raised slightly higher.
Once this mallet was not compressing the edges any further I levelled out the face as best I could. As I had another heavier mallet to move on to this was a fairly rough job, but the bat was close enough to level before I moved on.

I then used my newly purchased Slazenger mallet/grip cone combo to finish the job. (638g with a longer handle, so more mallet speed!)
I bought this from Eclipse all sports for less than 3 and had planned to add weight to it. Anyway - back on topic...
I then went back to work on the edge, starting lightly then increasing the force with which I hit the bat, again until the mallet was no longer making any new indentations.
From there I rounded the toe as well, going until the bat started lightly feathering (which was after a surprising amount of rounding!)
With the edges and toe done I evened the face again. This time I gave the middle a good hard wack to use as a guideline. Once the face was perfectly even (as this was the final stage I was a bit more precise about finishing it nicely).

The final stage was to glue the newly feathered toe so it's not going anywhere (or getting any worse).
As I'm now happy these are both fully knocked in I will apply some shoo goo to the toe, and maybe apply a new scuff sheet (although I'm toying with leaving them natural and only having a scuff sheet on my match bat).

Thanks again for the detailed guide, and apologies for rambling on!  :)
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tommo256

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #43 on: November 09, 2014, 06:04:18 PM »

Im probably gonna annoy a lot of people, I've never knocked a bat in. I get my bats normally from hunts, get them to give it another press, stick a cover sheet on it then use it in nets!
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19reading87

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #44 on: November 09, 2014, 06:21:50 PM »

Im probably gonna annoy a lot of people, I've never knocked a bat in. I get my bats normally from hunts, get them to give it another press, stick a cover sheet on it then use it in nets!

But you're a bowler so your bats don't matter as much right?!
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