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Author Topic: Ginger's Knocking In Process  (Read 88867 times)

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tommo256

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #45 on: November 09, 2014, 07:07:04 PM »

All rounder, I still want bats that go well!
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Gingerbusiness

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #46 on: November 09, 2014, 07:22:36 PM »

All rounder, I still want bats that go well!

Nothing wrong with this!

I have far too much kit for an all-rounder... I just want the best kit so I can pretend I am still as good as I was in my early 20s! :D
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Gingerbusiness

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #47 on: November 09, 2014, 07:27:54 PM »

After reading your excellent guide, I removed the scuff sheets from my new SSs and gave a modified version your process a go (minus the LV mallet as I don't own one).

I've done two bats so far and am pleased with the results.

After a healthy coat of Oil for each bat, I started off by rounding the edges on the bath. I felt this was better than going straight in with the mallet as it did the whole edge evenly (the same principal as Paul from IJC using the mallet handle to start rounding the edges.

I then started hitting the edges with my lighter mallet (369g), further compressing them. This made a sort of lip, the edge was compressed and the unknocked face was raised slightly higher.
Once this mallet was not compressing the edges any further I levelled out the face as best I could. As I had another heavier mallet to move on to this was a fairly rough job, but the bat was close enough to level before I moved on.

I then used my newly purchased Slazenger mallet/grip cone combo to finish the job. (638g with a longer handle, so more mallet speed!)
I bought this from Eclipse all sports for less than 3 and had planned to add weight to it. Anyway - back on topic...
I then went back to work on the edge, starting lightly then increasing the force with which I hit the bat, again until the mallet was no longer making any new indentations.
From there I rounded the toe as well, going until the bat started lightly feathering (which was after a surprising amount of rounding!)
With the edges and toe done I evened the face again. This time I gave the middle a good hard wack to use as a guideline. Once the face was perfectly even (as this was the final stage I was a bit more precise about finishing it nicely).

The final stage was to glue the newly feathered toe so it's not going anywhere (or getting any worse).
As I'm now happy these are both fully knocked in I will apply some shoo goo to the toe, and maybe apply a new scuff sheet (although I'm toying with leaving them natural and only having a scuff sheet on my match bat).

Thanks again for the detailed guide, and apologies for rambling on!  :)

I think the lignum vitae mallet issue here is a point of contention.

The only reason I have/use one is to cut down on the time it takes to mallet knock a bat.

It doesn't cut down on the time it takes to 'play in', nor does it fully protect the blade. I ALWAYS facesheet my bats - in my view, it is this which protects the blade, once the bat has been knocked in. It is a 50/50 protection process.

If you spend as much as I do on bats, better to be safe, than sorry!
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WalkingWicket37

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #48 on: November 09, 2014, 07:41:20 PM »

I think the lignum vitae mallet issue here is a point of contention.

The only reason I have/use one is to cut down on the time it takes to mallet knock a bat.

It doesn't cut down on the time it takes to 'play in', nor does it fully protect the blade. I ALWAYS facesheet my bats - in my view, it is this which protects the blade, once the bat has been knocked in. It is a 50/50 protection process.

If you spend as much as I do on bats, better to be safe, than sorry!

The 2 bats I've just finished are going to be my heavy net bat and a backup bat so if I scuff or not is yet to be decided.
Net bat I'm probably going to leave, I've just shoo gooed it so that's pretty much ready now for indoor nets.

The second one is a backup bat for match day/same weight as my match bat so may use in outdoor nets next season. Both these cost me sub 60 so I can afford not to scuff them but my OCD side is saying do it anyway!

And as far as the LV mallet goes I understand its purpose fully.
As I buy new bats every year for no reason one would probably benefit me, but I can't bring myself to spend that much on a mallet...
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Gingerbusiness

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #49 on: November 09, 2014, 07:45:29 PM »

The 2 bats I've just finished are going to be my heavy net bat and a backup bat so if I scuff or not is yet to be decided.
Net bat I'm probably going to leave, I've just shoo gooed it so that's pretty much ready now for indoor nets.

The second one is a backup bat for match day/same weight as my match bat so may use in outdoor nets next season. Both these cost me sub 60 so I can afford not to scuff them but my OCD side is saying do it anyway!

And as far as the LV mallet goes I understand its purpose fully.
As I buy new bats every year for no reason one would probably benefit me, but I can't bring myself to spend that much on a mallet...

Agreed with the 60 thing - but when you have 6 bats which have RRPs between 250 and 600... better to be safe, then crying when the toe comes off one! lol!
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WalkingWicket37

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #50 on: November 09, 2014, 07:55:12 PM »

Agreed with the 60 thing - but when you have 6 bats which have RRPs between 250 and 600... better to be safe, then crying when the toe comes off one! lol!
I've only ever bought one bat for more than 200 and I was worried knocking it in, using it and storing it! I did t want it to break so using it to hit cricket balls was a nightmare lol!

My match bat is an SS LE that cost me 89.99 posted (2nd hand), that was sold ready to play, so naturally I refurbed it, knocked in more (better safe than sorry) and applied a new scuff sheet, might not be the most expensive bat in the world but that's getting the cotton wool treatment from me!

Don't get me wrong, I like to look after all my bats, but when they're bought cheaply to use against bat breakers in the net I can bear the thought of that one breaking rather than my more expensive match bat!
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TBONTB

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #51 on: November 09, 2014, 08:28:22 PM »

About LV mallets, is it the weight that makes them so useful? or is it something intrinsic in the wood?

Hypothetically could I tape weight to one side of a mallet to weight it up to a kilo or so?
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The Palmist

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #52 on: November 09, 2014, 08:45:33 PM »

I think there may be a market for your knocking in service
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brokenbat

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #53 on: November 09, 2014, 11:28:38 PM »

I agree about oiling / knocking in without the scuff sheet. But here's the next question: at the end of the season, do you remove the scuff sheet and then oil it during the winter? Or leave the sheet on?
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Gingerbusiness

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Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #54 on: November 10, 2014, 12:44:27 AM »

I think there may be a market for your knocking in service

Haha - I charge my mates 30 each for the privilege. None of them have moaned yet though!
« Last Edit: November 10, 2014, 12:53:51 AM by Gingerbusiness »
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Gingerbusiness

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Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #55 on: November 10, 2014, 12:51:26 AM »

I agree about oiling / knocking in without the scuff sheet. But here's the next question: at the end of the season, do you remove the scuff sheet and then oil it during the winter? Or leave the sheet on?

That would depend on the bat itself. I would lightly oil/wax the bat again so it regains moisture lost DEPENDANT on the conditions the bat is kept in throughout the season and from what I can see.

I would say the most important thing, from what I have seen, is to make sure you do not oil in cracks and if you do oil it - make sure you let it dry for long enough. If you discard this, it can lift the wood. Make sure you have sealed the cracks with glue BEFORE OILING.

A bat is like anything made of high quality wood - you need to look after it if you want it to last.
« Last Edit: November 10, 2014, 12:54:40 AM by Gingerbusiness »
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brokenbat

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #56 on: November 10, 2014, 03:30:04 PM »

the debate stems from the view that once you oil a bat, and then apply a scuff sheet, the scuff sheet itself is adequate protection against the willow drying out. so, why remove the sheet? i am not sure what the truth is.
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ppccopener

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #57 on: November 10, 2014, 03:45:48 PM »

Ginge has got most of this covered,dont worry broken bat just go with the flow. If not, :) :) you know what Mark Waugh said? classy middle order player from the 80's and always got runs against us(england)-in fact he got bucketfuls..

now...I appreciate he got his bats given to him,handed over in nicely packaged- perfect weight-not a mark on them...but he said:
'I take it out of the wrapper mate,go in the nets and smash the hell out of it for an hour and if it dont break in two mate I use it in the tests''

excuse the Aussie accent
 :) :)
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Gingerbusiness

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #58 on: November 10, 2014, 06:40:40 PM »


the debate stems from the view that once you oil a bat, and then apply a scuff sheet, the scuff sheet itself is adequate protection against the willow drying out. so, why remove the sheet? i am not sure what the truth is.

As I said, it will be circumstantial. It will vary bat by bat.

There is no definite answer here. Yes, usually you will be ok but some people want to make sure it has had a 'full' recondition before resheeting their beloved bat.
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brokenbat

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Re: Ginger's Knocking In Process
« Reply #59 on: November 29, 2014, 02:10:47 AM »

what about the "playing in" part? do you go straight to nets, or vs the machine first?
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