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Author Topic: Pros and Cons of Heavy v Light Bats  (Read 16317 times)

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InternalTraining

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Re: Pros and Cons of Heavy v Light Bats
« Reply #30 on: May 30, 2015, 02:20:18 AM »

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AdClem

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Re: Pros and Cons of Heavy v Light Bats
« Reply #31 on: June 02, 2015, 01:35:12 PM »

This coincides with my experience: http://www.physics.usyd.edu.au/~cross/cricket.html - "1. Heavy vs Light Bats

The crowd loves a batter who can hit sixes. If you want to hit the ball as fast and far as possible, should you use a light or heavy bat? That's an age old question with plenty of answers, but which is the correct answer? Light bats can be swung faster than heavy bats, but only about 10% faster (for the usual range of bat weights). Imagine hypothetically that the bat weighs 10 grams - light as a feather. If you swing it as fast as possible, you might get the tip to travel at say 160 km/hr. Now double the weight to 20 gm. This time the tip travels at about 159 km/hr. The problem here is that your arms weigh about 8 kg all up, so the extra 0.01 kg is hardly noticeable. Most of the effort needed to swing a bat goes into swinging the arms. That's why light bats can be swung only about 10% faster than heavy bats.

If a light bat was swung at the same speed as a heavy bat and both hit the same ball, the heavy bat would pack more power since it has more energy and more momentum. But light bats can be swung 10% faster. If a bat is swung 10% faster, the ball comes off the bat about 7.5% faster. That almost makes up for the fact that light bats are basically less powerful when swung at the same speed as heavy bats. The end result is that heavy bats are about 1% more powerful than light bats. Having a heavy bat is a definite advantage if you swing all bats at the same medium speed, but if you need to move the bat quickly into position to strike the ball, a light bat will get there faster. Heavy for a 10 year old might be light for a 100 kg cricketer, so the real answer for raw bat power is to use a bat that is as heavy as feels comfortable to swing."

The consequence for me is that I own a lovely bat that I find, for all practical purposes, impossible to use.  I'm considering having some weight taken off it.  Also I've also noticed that recently bought bats have tended to put on weight.  My theory is that they're kiln dried to improve their weight:size ratio but take on ambient moisture and settle at their authentic weight.  I've noticed an increase of about 2 oz.  Anyone else found this?
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uknsaunders

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Re: Pros and Cons of Heavy v Light Bats
« Reply #32 on: June 02, 2015, 02:11:46 PM »

Are we talking Lavers here?
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Bat Wizard

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Re: Pros and Cons of Heavy v Light Bats
« Reply #33 on: June 02, 2015, 03:39:23 PM »

This coincides with my experience: http://www.physics.usyd.edu.au/~cross/cricket.html - "1. Heavy vs Light Bats

The crowd loves a batter who can hit sixes. If you want to hit the ball as fast and far as possible, should you use a light or heavy bat? That's an age old question with plenty of answers, but which is the correct answer? Light bats can be swung faster than heavy bats, but only about 10% faster (for the usual range of bat weights). Imagine hypothetically that the bat weighs 10 grams - light as a feather. If you swing it as fast as possible, you might get the tip to travel at say 160 km/hr. Now double the weight to 20 gm. This time the tip travels at about 159 km/hr. The problem here is that your arms weigh about 8 kg all up, so the extra 0.01 kg is hardly noticeable. Most of the effort needed to swing a bat goes into swinging the arms. That's why light bats can be swung only about 10% faster than heavy bats.

If a light bat was swung at the same speed as a heavy bat and both hit the same ball, the heavy bat would pack more power since it has more energy and more momentum. But light bats can be swung 10% faster. If a bat is swung 10% faster, the ball comes off the bat about 7.5% faster. That almost makes up for the fact that light bats are basically less powerful when swung at the same speed as heavy bats. The end result is that heavy bats are about 1% more powerful than light bats. Having a heavy bat is a definite advantage if you swing all bats at the same medium speed, but if you need to move the bat quickly into position to strike the ball, a light bat will get there faster. Heavy for a 10 year old might be light for a 100 kg cricketer, so the real answer for raw bat power is to use a bat that is as heavy as feels comfortable to swing."

The consequence for me is that I own a lovely bat that I find, for all practical purposes, impossible to use.  I'm considering having some weight taken off it.  Also I've also noticed that recently bought bats have tended to put on weight.  My theory is that they're kiln dried to improve their weight:size ratio but take on ambient moisture and settle at their authentic weight.  I've noticed an increase of about 2 oz.  Anyone else found this?






What u say is quite clear case of using over dried stick !!!
As trend is changing towards fat and light sticks , do we realise
How is this possible???
Offcourse bats those which loose moisture tend to become lighter in weight,
JSW are the biggest supplier currently for willows all over the world!!
They have a klin drying facility at there works, that just to get the moisture level
Down to recommended levels of moisture in the bat. Those bats which become drier
Than the normal needed level of moisture in the willow as down graded to lower in grade
Even being a beautiful willow. Those willows tend to gain weight when they come in contact
With weather with high moisture levels, and those bats tend to gain weight only, not all!!
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Bat Wizard

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Re: Pros and Cons of Heavy v Light Bats
« Reply #34 on: June 02, 2015, 03:57:09 PM »

Recently we have seen a lot of professional breaking all
Kinds of records in world of cricket. Do we actually know what
Weight of bats they use??
Recently, IPL just concluded in India. Record number of sixes and fours,
Maximum of those are the ones which are 2.10 plus in weight...
Heavy weight bats are good, very good indeed. But only good for shorter
Version of the Game. Be it T20 or one day. But if you intend to bat for a
Long innings, then they are a pain. Parts resulting in health issues....
Lighter bats are good , very good indeed. For players looking to use pace
Of the bowlers to there advantage. Very good for the longer version of the
Game, or if you indent to have a long innings. They are pain if you wanna
Hit against the pace sometimes.

So both are good in there case, use what suits your style more....
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Seniorplayer

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Re: Pros and Cons of Heavy v Light Bats
« Reply #35 on: June 02, 2015, 04:12:30 PM »

Recently we have seen a lot of professional breaking all
Kinds of records in world of cricket. Do we actually know what
Weight of bats they use??
Recently, IPL just concluded in India. Record number of sixes and fours,
Maximum of those are the ones which are 2.10 plus in weight...
Heavy weight bats are good, very good indeed. But only good for shorter
Version of the Game. Be it T20 or one day. But if you intend to bat for a
Long innings, then they are a pain. Parts resulting in health issues....
Lighter bats are good , very good indeed. For players looking to use pace
Of the bowlers to there advantage. Very good for the longer version of the
Game, or if you indent to have a long innings. They are pain if you wanna
Hit against the pace sometimes.

So both are good in there case, use what suits your style more....
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AdClem

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Re: Pros and Cons of Heavy v Light Bats
« Reply #36 on: June 02, 2015, 11:14:44 PM »

Are we talking Lavers here?
Newbery.  But, just so I don't leave the wrong impression, I'm not anti Newbery.  I now have a Kudos that I'm really comfortable with; despite its weight gain.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2015, 08:24:16 AM by AdClem »
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TangoWhiskey

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Re: Pros and Cons of Heavy v Light Bats
« Reply #37 on: June 03, 2015, 09:54:23 AM »

How has this thread turned into some kind of poetry?
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edge

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Re: Pros and Cons of Heavy v Light Bats
« Reply #38 on: June 03, 2015, 10:04:20 AM »

Bat weight haikus?

Weight must be chosen
On your bat speed strength and shots
Pick what you prefer
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AdClem

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Re: Pros and Cons of Heavy v Light Bats
« Reply #39 on: June 03, 2015, 11:46:38 AM »

How has this thread turned into some kind of poetry?

Poetry in motion.
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trypewriter

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Re: Pros and Cons of Heavy v Light Bats
« Reply #40 on: June 03, 2015, 12:43:27 PM »

Spot on Dave

The older I get, the more I realise I can't tell how I'm gonna play with a bat, until I'm out there in the middle.
It doesn't matter how well it picks up for the weight, ,dead weight is dead weight
And your not really gonna discover that until you try and cut that first short ball or sweep a shot to leg.

I think I've dropped down from 3lb to 2.9 now, and may possibly go lighter next season, over 35yrs of playing.

My findings exactly. Back in the day I used a 3lb bat and no surprise, when I made contact the ball went miles. After a 25 year break from playing and now in my dotage I discovered that I couldn't use a 3lb bat. I went right down to 2lb 7oz and couldn't get the ball off the square! It's a great bat too - just sold it to a guy who carted it all round the park with it. I've now settled in the 2-9 2-10 range and can hit the odd boundary.
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frooper11

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Re: Pros and Cons of Heavy v Light Bats
« Reply #41 on: June 03, 2015, 12:48:25 PM »

Used my new B&S Assegai (2.5lb bat featured in a thread last year) in a couple of games this season and have to say whilst bat speed is increased I can't actual feel there's a bat there if that makes any sense. This leads me to think it's too light for me.
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Akewstick

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Re: Pros and Cons of Heavy v Light Bats
« Reply #42 on: June 03, 2015, 11:27:48 PM »

I worried about this all last month and have stopped. I broke the handle on my best bat (2lb 8.5) and did most preseason nets with my second choice (No Swearing Please) GM 303 (2lb 13), and matched my highest score with it first game back.

When I got my much better, but lighter bat back, I scored 8 and couldn't middle anything in the nets. I really didn't want to face having to use my (No Swearing Please) 60 GM over the 240 g1 bat on the grounds it was too light. Anyway, next game I beat my top score including a huuge straight six down the ground, how? Timing. I'd got used to the bat, if it's not so dramatically wrong you can't get used to timing shots with it, get the most responsive bat you can and get to know it, the pros and cons of weights are nothing next to a good bit of willow you're used to swinging.
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brokenbat

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Re: Pros and Cons of Heavy v Light Bats
« Reply #43 on: June 04, 2015, 04:05:59 AM »

Sir Garfield Sobers used 2lb 6, and this guy called Bradman used 2lb 2!
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