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Author Topic: Cleft Weights  (Read 707 times)

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WSB

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Cleft Weights
« on: January 10, 2017, 09:44:05 PM »

Does anyone have any data on dried cleft weights prior to shaping. Just trying to make some calculations. I know thats a 'how long is a piece of string' type of question because clefts vary in length and often spine and edge thickness (obviously an OS cleft is generally going to weigh more than a JS W cleft). But if anyone has any data on cleft weights that would be really useful when helping calculate drying times.
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Re: Cleft Weights
« Reply #1 on: January 10, 2017, 09:57:55 PM »

If you aim for 10% rather than concentrate on weight, you won't be too far away.
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Re: Cleft Weights
« Reply #2 on: January 10, 2017, 09:59:34 PM »

Air drying alone won't get you there, you will need to artificially dry.
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Seniorplayer

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Re: Cleft Weights
« Reply #3 on: January 10, 2017, 10:03:06 PM »

 8   4 1/2  inch  clefts cut from 2ft 4inch   Long freshly felled willow  round  will each have around 15 percent moisture.
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WSB

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Re: Cleft Weights
« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2017, 10:11:48 PM »

Thanks for the info - I already know about the 10% mixture content as a drying guide. They've been air drying for 7 months and are between 18 and 20% dry - nice and unstressed out in a natural environment. They've been in the kiln but the moisture meters I have - both not cheap but rather mid range ones (top end ones cost 1,000's). But they're both giving different readings - within 3% of each other mind - so thought Id cross reference against specific weights rather than rely on the meters too much.
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Re: Cleft Weights
« Reply #5 on: January 10, 2017, 10:14:07 PM »

 As an altertive to kiln drying To get the weight down  near to the ten percent mositure weight bat makers prefer to work with you can remove the bark and stack the clefts in the open  off the ground to season on wooden foundations with the ends sealed for 12 months followed by placing the clefts in an open ended shed for a further 3 months.
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WSB

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Re: Cleft Weights
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2017, 10:16:36 PM »

8   4 1/2  inch  clefts cut from 2ft 4inch   Long freshly felled willow  round  will each have around 15 percent moisture.

They'll have a lot more than 15% moisture in them when they're green. Not sure of the % but after 7 months in the air they're at 20% so they'd have been 40 to 50%. They were soaked and the water sprayed off them when I ran them on a saw - so probably saturated to 60%.
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WSB

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Re: Cleft Weights
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2017, 10:23:37 PM »

Just read your post moisture meters will give different reading as your measuring the surface of the bat.

But different readings on the same place on the same cleft. Im guessing its not an exact science - same as those stud wall detectors that are very much hit and miss. The alternative to measuring the surface would be to saw the wood up and measure the inside - so the 10% figure that is taken as standard must all come from surface readings not internal ones.
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Re: Cleft Weights
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2017, 10:28:35 PM »

I think moisture is tested by taking a  sample cleft from a batch and drilling it there's a thread on here explaining it but I cannot locate it.
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WSB

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Re: Cleft Weights
« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2017, 10:34:44 PM »

I think moisture is tested by taking a  sample cleft from a batch and drilling it there's a thread on here explaining it but I cannot locate it.

That would be useful info ! Im planning on sawing one up as it happens anyway to get a better reading and an indication of what the water content is inside. But as they were air dried for a good amount of time the moisture will be pretty consistent at the time of going into the kiln. It may be that they need to sit for a bit to even out again now
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Re: Cleft Weights
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2017, 10:35:36 PM »

They'll have a lot more than 15% moisture in them when they're green. Not sure of the % but after 7 months in the air they're at 20% so they'd have been 40 to 50%. They were soaked and the water sprayed off them when I ran them on a saw - so probably saturated to 60%.

The 15percent moisture quoted is taken from a forestry commission document and refers to freshly cut willow cut and split into clefts using a wedge axe and maul tool.
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WSB

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Re: Cleft Weights
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2017, 10:43:36 PM »

The 15percent moisture quoted is taken from a forestry commission document and refers to freshly cut willow cut and split into clefts using a wedge axe and maul tool.

Having worked with the clefts Id say they missed a 0 off. 150% would be closer to the mark ! They're absolutely drenched - by its very nature it sucks up water and loves moisture. Thats why it grows best in England and not in hot countries
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Tom

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Re: Cleft Weights
« Reply #12 on: January 10, 2017, 10:52:01 PM »

Have you got this book @WSB - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Life-Times-Cricket-Bat-Willow/dp/0953404102

From memory it covers some of the more technical bits of willow, but still probably too high level.
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JK Lewis

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Re: Cleft Weights
« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2017, 07:49:23 AM »

I used maths for this challenge, at the end of last year. I measured up 10 clefts from another supplier, and they averaged out at 0.41 grams per cubic centimetre. Try measuring, and weighing, if you need my spreadsheet I can send it over, enter the data and Excel will make the calculations for you.
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WSB

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Re: Cleft Weights
« Reply #14 on: January 11, 2017, 06:43:45 PM »

Have you got this book @WSB - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Life-Times-Cricket-Bat-Willow/dp/0953404102

From memory it covers some of the more technical bits of willow, but still probably too high level.

Hi there - Ive got that book. It mainly deals with the growing and care of the tree, with some info on clefts and bats. It doesn't go into the real precise specifics of clefts and suchlike - barely mentions drying methods really. Thanks for trying though !
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