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Author Topic: Edge batmaking  (Read 9743 times)

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Chompy9760

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Re: Edge batmaking
« Reply #90 on: April 26, 2019, 01:21:26 AM »

You are a true craftsman Edge - they are all beautifully done!

Just a question on the last one, with all that irregularities on the bottom half of the blade, why wasn't the handle put in the other end?  I assume it was a partmade?
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edge

Re: Edge batmaking
« Reply #91 on: April 26, 2019, 01:33:18 AM »

Cheers @Chompy9760 , very kind! It was a part made yep, but I would have done the same if I was handling it myself. The marks in the lower half of the blade are all just butterfly stains, which won't negatively affect the bat at all - in fact the stained areas usually ping a little better, so the one you can see showing through around the middle of the bat is actually in a great position on the blade. More importantly, most maker's first priority when choosing which end to handle is how the grains run through either end of the cleft, and the grains are beautifully straight through the toe, so it's ideal from that point of view too.
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JK Lewis

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Re: Edge batmaking
« Reply #92 on: April 26, 2019, 01:36:59 AM »

Nice work again Ed. Another bat, another ton? Best wishes for the new season.
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Chompy9760

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Re: Edge batmaking
« Reply #93 on: April 26, 2019, 02:07:58 AM »

Cheers @Chompy9760 , very kind! It was a part made yep, but I would have done the same if I was handling it myself. The marks in the lower half of the blade are all just butterfly stains, which won't negatively affect the bat at all - in fact the stained areas usually ping a little better, so the one you can see showing through around the middle of the bat is actually in a great position on the blade. More importantly, most maker's first priority when choosing which end to handle is how the grains run through either end of the cleft, and the grains are beautifully straight through the toe, so it's ideal from that point of view too.

Thanks for the reply - fair enough!  I can only judge from the pics, but the grains at the top of the bat also look lovely and straight, however I don't know what's under the sticker!

I've spent a fair bit of time cutting and splitting wood with an axe, and while I can't vouch for 'ping', I can tell you without doubt that it's at least twice as hard to split wood with with knots in it Vs straight grains.  Anyone swinging an axe aims to avoid the irregularites if possible, to get the most split wood with the least ammount of effort.  So I'm certain that you have a durable bat that is most unlikely to split. :)  I'll take that over looks any day.

The worst thing about having a durable bat, is that it lowers your chances of needing to make/buy another one :D
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edge

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Re: Edge batmaking
« Reply #94 on: April 26, 2019, 02:49:44 AM »

Nice work again Ed. Another bat, another ton? Best wishes for the new season.
Ha thanks Justin, hopeful for more this season but not with this one - it's off to someone else, so hopefully they get a few too.

@Chompy9760 sounds like you might be unfamiliar with butterfly stain - no knots here! Butterfly is a staining of the wood caused when the tree is pruned or branches crack off and some of the colouring from the bark leaks into the wood - looks a bit funny to some but makes bloody good bats. https://www.laverwood.com/laver-woods-cricket-bat-lore-ch-5-butterfly-willow/
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Chompy9760

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Re: Edge batmaking
« Reply #95 on: April 26, 2019, 03:37:02 AM »

Not totally unfamiliar with butterfly, but obviously have plenty to learn!  Thanks for the link.  With a closer look I can see that the grains indeed go through the stain.

Sorry, I did not meed to imply that your bat had knots in it!  I remember reading on the JS Wright website that butterfly added to the strength of the bat, and was adding to it with my axe experiences.  Regrdless, I wouldn't be too proud to own that bat :)


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jonny77

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Re: Edge batmaking
« Reply #96 on: April 26, 2019, 06:41:06 AM »

Great effort again @edge. Did you find the Butterfly willow different to work with? I remember in one of Aldreds videos he's says he prefers working with it.
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edge

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Re: Edge batmaking
« Reply #97 on: April 26, 2019, 01:11:33 PM »

Great effort again @edge. Did you find the Butterfly willow different to work with? I remember in one of Aldreds videos he's says he prefers working with it.
I don't find it too different to be honest, other than it can be a bit harder around the stain so you need to pay extra attention there.
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edge

Re: Edge batmaking
« Reply #98 on: July 12, 2019, 05:13:48 PM »

Bat 007 ready for one of my clubmates, really pleased with the shape on this one. 2lb9.5 and just nips though the bat gauge.





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