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Author Topic: Bat Speed - Stationary high back lift vs Traditional back lift  (Read 1281 times)

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LBWCandidate

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Nowadays, almost everyone has started using stationary high back lift with their bat raised before the bowl is bowled. My question is which one of these will have higher bat speed coming down on the ball:
A) Stationary high back lift with bat raised
B) Traditional back lift with the bat being raised a bowler is about to bowl as it gives momentum to the bat swing.
C) Or both will be similar

Just a thought which came to my mind while watching T20 cricket where everyone has their bat raised.
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liscon12

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Re: Bat Speed - Stationary high back lift vs Traditional back lift
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2018, 07:12:56 PM »

I think its down to power hitting when you have the bat rasied, a lot of coaching on it is derived from baseball where they have the bat raised high up.
 
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DorsetDan

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Re: Bat Speed - Stationary high back lift vs Traditional back lift
« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2018, 07:23:49 PM »

I think it is a bit of a misconception that a high backlift automatically means power and bat speed. Look how many big hitting players play spin even if they have a high backlift against pace... very low, pretty much down by the feet. It's all a balance of rhythm, control and brute power which is different for different players and even against different bowlers
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Buzz

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Re: Bat Speed - Stationary high back lift vs Traditional back lift
« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2018, 07:29:08 PM »

Personally I don't think there is much of a difference.
If you are a rhythm batsman then having a tap on the ground can help.
But by being upright it is easier to keep your head still.

The reason a lot of batters stay upright is because with heavier bats it is easier to start with the bat up.
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golders

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Re: Bat Speed - Stationary high back lift vs Traditional back lift
« Reply #4 on: April 23, 2018, 07:46:17 PM »

A lot of players like De Villiers and Root have a high backlift but it isn't stationary.I used to rest my bat by my foot until the bowler reached his blind but was told I was picking up the bat late,so changed it.
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Bats_Entertainment

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Re: Bat Speed - Stationary high back lift vs Traditional back lift
« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2018, 09:05:11 PM »

Even those who tap have their bat up at the point of delivery. Can't think of a high profile current player that doesn't.

Flintoff and Gilchrist were notable rare exceptions in their era.
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Seniorplayer

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Re: Bat Speed - Stationary high back lift vs Traditional back lift
« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2018, 09:10:16 PM »

The thought  behind an high back lift  for some is that  you only have to think about bringing the bat down rather than having to pick it up  and then bring it down
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bk

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Re: Bat Speed - Stationary high back lift vs Traditional back lift
« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2018, 09:20:48 PM »

High back-lift means a longer bat swing which means more power. Better approach for power hitting (and heavier bats)
Challenge is getting triggers right so that head is able to move into the ball quickly enough to start and complete a full bat swing.
Additional challenge is grooving a repeatable bat swing. The higher you lift the bat the more room there is for stuff to go wrong (theoretically).
This is why so many modern players use a crouch as part of their trigger movements. It helps get everything moving consistently. Problem is if you get it wrong (like Eoin Morgan a few years ago) everything goes to pieces.
Shorter back lifts also need more strength to get the bat swing going. The more you use just one part of your body (or physical strength) to provide power the more likely you are to be inconsistent.
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InternalTraining

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Re: Bat Speed - Stationary high back lift vs Traditional back lift
« Reply #8 on: April 23, 2018, 09:50:45 PM »

I have to try it. I feel that I'd lose some control during the down swing to compensate for the turning ball. It'd work in a t-20 situation where ball is not turning or swinging.

Lot of these t-20 pitches are non-turning duds, so baseball works very well against straight and fast balls. No wonder these batsmen flounder against good Test bowling. :D
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batmatt

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Re: Bat Speed - Stationary high back lift vs Traditional back lift
« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2018, 10:53:39 PM »

How many golfers start from the top of their swing?
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potzy248

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Re: Bat Speed - Stationary high back lift vs Traditional back lift
« Reply #10 on: April 24, 2018, 12:23:43 AM »

How many golfers start from the top of their swing?

Force Summation. Need the wind up through the legs first so starting low helps with this.
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Bats_Entertainment

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Re: Bat Speed - Stationary high back lift vs Traditional back lift
« Reply #11 on: April 24, 2018, 12:34:10 AM »

Golfers don't have the ball coming at them a high speed. Not a like for like comparison.

Batsmen 'crouch' to get their eyes low (closer to the bal). Being tall, I find that with this there is a trade-off with feeling comfortable and relaxed.
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sgcricket

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Re: Bat Speed - Stationary high back lift vs Traditional back lift
« Reply #12 on: April 24, 2018, 03:49:34 AM »

The most important thing is a stable base and being comfortable at the crease. I start with a low back lift which automatically goes higher the longer I bat (at least that's what I feel). If I had to think about the back lift, I wouldn't be comfortable at all.
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WalkingWicket37

Re: Bat Speed - Stationary high back lift vs Traditional back lift
« Reply #13 on: April 24, 2018, 09:28:07 AM »

You lot think far too much...
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FattusCattus

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Re: Bat Speed - Stationary high back lift vs Traditional back lift
« Reply #14 on: April 24, 2018, 10:17:30 AM »

It's not the speed of the backs wing, it's the violence of it.

It's also good to hold the pose after a violent swish.
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