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Author Topic: Trigger vs Staying Still  (Read 4494 times)

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Seniorplayer

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Re: Trigger vs Staying Still
« Reply #15 on: June 08, 2018, 02:43:39 PM »

Bat up because then you only have to bring the bat down
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six and out

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Re: Trigger vs Staying Still
« Reply #16 on: June 08, 2018, 03:28:11 PM »

being still when the ball is delivered is where you want to be. if you trigger in to a "ready" position. that is up to you.

ultimately, the trigger is there to get you in to a good position to play your cricket shots. you should be have completed the trigger by the time the bowler releases the ball otherwise you're moving whilst hitting - a good guide is to start the trigger when the bowler reaches the umpire, be ware the sprinting bowler!!

Cricket is hard enough standing still, don't make it more complicated by moving against a moving ball :-D

I have had a trigger for as long as i can remember, i actually think 'ready position' is a very good way (and possibly better way) of describing it because you should be well done and dusted with your trigger before the bowler is into his gather as Buzz has said.

To this end i have now found it better to not trigger and take a different guard when facing spinners (or a seamer with a really short run up), as it also allows you to be in a better position to come down the wicket.

Ultimately as Steve Smith has shown it is what works for you.
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stevat

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Re: Trigger vs Staying Still
« Reply #17 on: June 08, 2018, 03:53:50 PM »

Bat up because then you only have to bring the bat down
I think this potentially has merit against a proper quick, where you can time the ball into gaps etc, but if you want to add pace to the ball and you're not massively strong I found that shifting weight onto my back foot slightly and lifting the bat up as the bowler delivers leads me to turn my shoulder towards the ball helping me transfer weight into a shot, and also gives me a bit of rhythm. (something sadly lacking in my dancing).

I think that is far more of a grey area than head still to judge line and length.  Depends on player and technique.
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stevat

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Re: Trigger vs Staying Still
« Reply #18 on: June 08, 2018, 03:58:52 PM »

Further more, with regards to that article, Hussey was a fine player, but if you watch him bat - just checked it out - he stands with the bat in a hover just above the knee like the article suggests, but he does lift it higher when the ball is released like I suggested and rolls his shoulders into the shot.
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pablomarmite

Re: Trigger vs Staying Still
« Reply #19 on: June 08, 2018, 07:11:05 PM »

Further to the above, I advocate watching the ball in the bowlers hand in his run up. If you trigger you need to be done and in position by the time the bowler gets to his gather.


I have always done this but have been try to stop doing it and instead follow the advice from the pros in this article.

http://www.thecricketmonthly.com/story/1136242/what-does-a-batsman-see
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Smmatle1

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Re: Trigger vs Staying Still
« Reply #20 on: June 08, 2018, 07:38:15 PM »

Interesting article, keen to give this method a try. Thanks
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Buzz

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Re: Trigger vs Staying Still
« Reply #21 on: June 08, 2018, 07:47:04 PM »

Loved reading that article. Thanks.
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smilley792

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Re: Trigger vs Staying Still
« Reply #22 on: June 08, 2018, 07:55:44 PM »

I dont triggernin general, but when attacking I sometimes move away before the below bowls to open up the off.

I wanna be still and stable ready to play, not shuffling about.



Also bat up in stance, and it goes even further up at end of innings to try and hit it harder(faster)?) but Ill admit I lose some control.
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InternalTraining

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Re: Trigger vs Staying Still
« Reply #23 on: June 08, 2018, 08:16:31 PM »

1. I trigger to middle stump and sometimes off which opens up the leg side for me. It actually makes it difficult to play on the off side if the line is middle/off/close to off.

2. My trigger is complete before the ball is released which means that I am still (head and feet) at the point of release.

3. My observation is that trigger works best against a swinging and quick delivery. For a slow/medium bowler, my trigger actually throws off my line. Against a slow/medium I do a very small or no trigger. I do recommend doing a trigger against a left-arm fast/medium bowler from over the wicket. The trigger (angled) helps me get in line better to line up my drives.

4. I am also experimenting with no forward press against spinners. So far in nets, this approach has resulted in some very clean hits. I can hit with a forward press as well but its just too much work sometimes and I need my legs by the time I get to the spinners. :D
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edge

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Re: Trigger vs Staying Still
« Reply #24 on: June 08, 2018, 08:30:32 PM »

I have always done this but have been try to stop doing it and instead follow the advice from the pros in this article.

http://www.thecricketmonthly.com/story/1136242/what-does-a-batsman-see

Also changed from watching the ball through the run-up to a similar method after reading that article, definite improvement for me!
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Calzehbhoy

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Re: Trigger vs Staying Still
« Reply #25 on: June 08, 2018, 09:05:03 PM »

Trigger is all very well if you are then still by the time the ball is released.

I've always had a trigger movement (Wierdly it was usually my back foot backwards slightly) but recently discovered I was really struggling to time anything and was very late on shots. I've made a conscious effort to amend this so I am triggering a lot earlier (just as the bowler is coming into his delivery stride) which means I've moved and am then still again by the time the ball is delivered. I actually trained it by watching youtube Batsman headcam videos and pretending I was batting (Quite sad I know)

It has helped me no end and I feel a lot sturdier and have more time to play the shot I want at the crease now.

Scrap everything I said!

Faced the 1XIs quickest bowler this evening at nets and he hit my thigh pad before Id even started moving forward from my trigger backwards.
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stevat

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Re: Trigger vs Staying Still
« Reply #26 on: June 08, 2018, 09:58:23 PM »

Scrap everything I said!

Faced the 1XIs quickest bowler this evening at nets and he hit my thigh pad before Id even started moving forward from my trigger backwards.
Need a trigger for your trigger.
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Tom_90

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Re: Trigger vs Staying Still
« Reply #27 on: June 08, 2018, 10:37:29 PM »

I stay as still as i can with bat up.

That article is a very good read, however I think at my level the point about picking up cues from the bowlers run up probably isn't very accurate as half the time the bowler has no idea where it is going! Some interesting ideas about where to focus and switching off between deliveries though!
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Biggie Smalls

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Re: Trigger vs Staying Still
« Reply #28 on: June 09, 2018, 04:09:44 AM »

I never had a trigger as such , just a squat into ready position. Ive always been a front foot player and this seemed to work fine.
Last 5mths ive just returned from major knee injury and was forced to change myself into a back foot player as I'll never be able to get properly forward (squat or lunge movements are a real challenge) ever again.
I watched a lot of back foot players and adopted what works for me. A.t.m i have a massive back and across movement into a ready position ( back foot goes from an inch outside leg to an inch outside off , and my back foot is a bit less than a bat length from the stumps  ). This feels an ugly technique and initially messed with my head .Sure , im basically imitating s.smith (poors mans version of course). My head is level and my body still at release point so I'm ok with my ugly massive trigger. Actually , im really enjoying batting this way . I have new challenges now ......still working on getting my offside scoring up to something resembling what it used to be....but I'm loving how my legside play has improved massively - balls on the pads now feel like money for old rope.....thats new for me and i like it.
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InternalTraining

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Re: Trigger vs Staying Still
« Reply #29 on: June 09, 2018, 04:54:11 AM »

On bouncy pitches, hanging on the back foot results in a lot of runs. You can easily pounce on short balls for pulls, (backfoot) punches , and even cuts if you get in position early.
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