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Author Topic: Bat size restrictions  (Read 1282 times)

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edge

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Re: Bat size restrictions
« Reply #30 on: July 11, 2018, 12:44:13 PM »

I might be wrong but I cant imagine that this would have an effect. Surely the handle would have a far greater degree of flex than the blade. Even if you have a thick oval handle.
Saw in the science lab an equation about kinetic energy, something like KE= mass x 2 + speed squared. Meaning that the swing speed has a far larger effect than the mass of the bat. I only scraped though there physics GCSE so may Not have any relevance.
It absolutely has an effect, but not a large one, hence players still belting it everywhere post bat size restrictions.

Separate issue really but in the very specific case of a human hitting a cricket ball with a bat then mass effectively wins - the increase in power you get from using a heavier bat is more than the amount of power you'll lose from the corresponding drop in bat speed. Assuming your timing remains the same of course.
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CricketXI

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Re: Bat size restrictions
« Reply #31 on: July 11, 2018, 03:22:53 PM »

To me the high scorers are just the evolution of the game, it is suppose to happen with better pitches( -unlike to that of 80's and 90's where ball can deviate 180 degrees after pitching.) fast and smoother out fields, the batting technique and batsmen having more confidence on their hitting ability owing to the specialized nets/practices and training, same thing can be said about the fielding standards which have evolved a long way from the early days.
The batsmen ability and confidence can be easily seen these days when teams really bank on casing anything under 330
Even in 90's batsmen with confidence and hitting ability (Like Sanath, Afridi, Gilchrist) were having strike rate of 90+ and during those times there were no big bats. Its just that there have been increase in such kind of a batsmen now. And there are proper batsmen down the order as well which has caused the hike in the scores.
Bowling has not evolved ever since or even worse the standards have dipped massively, when I last checked there was only one fast bowler in top 10 in T20I bowler's ranking. This is more even in ODIs but if you go down the ranking you will find more and more spinners, which is kind of odd as many teams do not go with more than one spinner in their lineup.
If we see there are no 150 kmph+ bowlers around baring Stack, I was watching an England match where commentators described Mark Wood as a really fast bowler and he never crosses 150 Kmph mark.
Adding to this there are no quality seam bowlers. I can understand why commentators will never address the issue of depleting bowling ability around the world.
Yes big bats added to that, but actually there were not many players using 45 mm+ edges bats . Its more down to the bowlers who are happily giving away 8 or 9 runs per over, earlier that could have caused a bowler his career, but it is Okay now.
Good bowlers are still getting wickets and keeping the run rate down, even on seaming/swinging conditions we have seen batsmen struggling, which clearly describe if the bowler has the ability to move the ball he can get the wickets and restrict huge scores.
 I believe the huge scores are due to lack of good bowlers around the world.
The playing conditions will always improve from bats, balls, wickets, protection, grounds. It is the player who needs to improve along, seems like fielders and batsmen are way ahead of the bowlers now.
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SLA

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Re: Bat size restrictions
« Reply #32 on: July 11, 2018, 03:40:32 PM »

To me the high scorers are just the evolution of the game, it is suppose to happen with better pitches( -unlike to that of 80's and 90's where ball can deviate 180 degrees after pitching.) fast and smoother out fields, the batting technique and batsmen having more confidence on their hitting ability owing to the specialized nets/practices and training, same thing can be said about the fielding standards which have evolved a long way from the early days.
The batsmen ability and confidence can be easily seen these days when teams really bank on casing anything under 330
Even in 90's batsmen with confidence and hitting ability (Like Sanath, Afridi, Gilchrist) were having strike rate of 90+ and during those times there were no big bats. Its just that there have been increase in such kind of a batsmen now. And there are proper batsmen down the order as well which has caused the hike in the scores.
Bowling has not evolved ever since or even worse the standards have dipped massively, when I last checked there was only one fast bowler in top 10 in T20I bowler's ranking. This is more even in ODIs but if you go down the ranking you will find more and more spinners, which is kind of odd as many teams do not go with more than one spinner in their lineup.
If we see there are no 150 kmph+ bowlers around baring Stack, I was watching an England match where commentators described Mark Wood as a really fast bowler and he never crosses 150 Kmph mark.
Adding to this there are no quality seam bowlers. I can understand why commentators will never address the issue of depleting bowling ability around the world.
Yes big bats added to that, but actually there were not many players using 45 mm+ edges bats . Its more down to the bowlers who are happily giving away 8 or 9 runs per over, earlier that could have caused a bowler his career, but it is Okay now.
Good bowlers are still getting wickets and keeping the run rate down, even on seaming/swinging conditions we have seen batsmen struggling, which clearly describe if the bowler has the ability to move the ball he can get the wickets and restrict huge scores.
 I believe the huge scores are due to lack of good bowlers around the world.
The playing conditions will always improve from bats, balls, wickets, protection, grounds. It is the player who needs to improve along, seems like fielders and batsmen are way ahead of the bowlers now.


Its just a matter of focus. No-one can focus on every skill at once, you have to pick. If young players focus on developing white ball skills, then red ball skills will be eroded. Bowlers focus on practicing nailing 1-over spells with 6 different deliveries, not how to work over a batsmen over the course of a 10 over spell of supreme pace (or flight) and accuracy before eventually dismissing them.

Batsmen work on their power hitting and 360 shot options, but how many test batsmen are there that can do all three or even 2 out of 3 out of a) play spin well, b) survive for a session on a green-top and c) deal with short fast and nasty stuff. Hardly any - maybe 4 or 5 in world cricket? Back in the 90s you would have a list as long as your arm.
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SD

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Re: Bat size restrictions
« Reply #33 on: July 11, 2018, 03:47:16 PM »

A couple of years ago before the bat restrictions came in I as speaking to a guy from Gray Nicolls who told me that their research suggested that the timing and bat speed generated by the batsman had a far greater impact on the distance a ball travelled than the amount of wood in the bat.  So far the bat restrictions seem to have had little impact
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CricketXI

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Re: Bat size restrictions
« Reply #34 on: July 11, 2018, 04:42:23 PM »

@SLA :

You correctly mentioned about kind of specializations  players are after for. But the bowlers are evolving as quickly as the fielders or batsmen.
In recent past we have seen and praised the batsmen struggling, taking body blows but gutting out in the middle on a tough wicket, but I do not remember any bowler gutting out in the middle apart from two instances both involving the greats of these days - Styne and Malinga  both in Sub continent bowling like masters of the game.

IN T20I I can only remember only Malinga having such an impact for so long. Fast bowlers are trading off speed and accuracy for variations.
Variations are really necessary, but most of the variations are bowling slow balls, which can be easily dealt with. No bowlers seems to add variations in terms of developing a fast ball, Inswinger/outswinger, yorkers, seamers.
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