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Author Topic: Chris King (GN) article  (Read 2449 times)

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LEACHY48

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Re: Chris King (GN) article
« Reply #30 on: July 28, 2018, 08:10:56 PM »

Its all just absolute guff thats trying to fool people into not knocking a bat and voiding the warranty
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Mfarank

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Re: Chris King (GN) article
« Reply #31 on: July 28, 2018, 09:24:18 PM »

Its all just absolute guff thats trying to fool people into not knocking a bat and voiding the warranty
Why do u think all pakistani bats have those "fully knocked" and "ready to play" stickers on them?
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Gurujames

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Re: Chris King (GN) article
« Reply #32 on: July 28, 2018, 09:27:53 PM »

I imagine its to make the deal look better as knocking in costs an extra 30.
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Seniorplayer

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Re: Chris King (GN) article
« Reply #33 on: July 29, 2018, 09:01:14 AM »

I. Think the article is saying  generally modern bats don't need as much knocking in to bring them to their trampoline effect as they are pressed in such a way that the bat fibres are pushed together and the bats are close  to there peak and the bat fibres will begin to  separate before a ball hits the bat where as bats used to be pressed in a way that required knocking in playing in to  compress the  blade fibres prior to delamination beginning
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LEACHY48

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Re: Chris King (GN) article
« Reply #34 on: July 29, 2018, 11:01:25 AM »

I. Think the article is saying  generally modern bats don't need as much knocking in to bring them to their trampoline effect as they are pressed in such a way that the bat fibres are pushed together and the bats are close  to there peak and the bat fibres will begin to  separate before a ball hits the bat where as bats used to be pressed in a way that required knocking in playing in to  compress the  blade fibres prior to delamination beginning

and thats still a load of guff...if anything bats nowadays require more knocking in because they are softly pressed because many people don't understand the concept of pressed to perform and everyone asks for a "SOFT" bat.
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JK Lewis

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Re: Chris King (GN) article
« Reply #35 on: July 29, 2018, 11:30:02 AM »

It seems unlikely that any pro, handed 5 bats or whatever for free, would have the time or the inclination to knock them all in. So - in my opinion - it's safe to assume that they 'ping from the get-go'. For the rest of us, the main questions are how much time do I have spare for knocking in, and how long do I want a bat to last for? For me personally, I have no time for knocking in, never have. I am happy to get a new bat settled in nets, with used balls. Seems to work OK. But then, I'm not at all concerned about dents and cracks on the face and edges, for me these are badges of honour. I like my bat to look worn, I like marks, I like adding a bit of tape. I like a bat that I can study after a long inning and remember how certain marks were made. I also strongly believe that a worn, cracked bat is better for taking the shine off the ball, which is my job after all.

The only exception I make at first is the toe. I do knock the toe in for a few minutes, hitting hard with a mallet. Digging out pacey, new ball yorkers is a bat breaker, so worth trying to guard against. But you know, stuff happens, and if I need to buy or make a new bat each year, that's fine with me.
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SD

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Re: Chris King (GN) article
« Reply #36 on: July 29, 2018, 12:45:38 PM »

Pros have the benefit of hours with of throw down and net practice a week in which they can play in new bats so could achieve in under a week what could take me months with a mallet in my free time.  I have never had a bat across all grades and all manufacturers that performed at its based straight out of the box
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Seniorplayer

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Re: Chris King (GN) article
« Reply #37 on: July 29, 2018, 05:22:41 PM »

and thats still a load of guff...if anything bats nowadays require more knocking in because they are softly pressed because many people don't understand the concept of pressed to perform and everyone asks for a "SOFT" bat.

Or maybe softer pressed so that  bat fibres uncurl  quicker allowing a faster trampoline effect.

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Novak

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Re: Chris King (GN) article
« Reply #38 on: July 29, 2018, 05:27:03 PM »

Quick question there is something I read about grains Vs more grains


True or false 5 grains bat is a younger bat then a 12 grain bat ?

I think that's true ?

How does that effect the bat ? If at all ?  Does a younger bat take longer to open up ?
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Seniorplayer

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Re: Chris King (GN) article
« Reply #39 on: July 29, 2018, 05:57:29 PM »

True the less  grains there is the younger  the tree generally the fewer the grains the longer the bat takes to reach its potential
« Last Edit: July 30, 2018, 07:46:27 AM by Seniorplayer »
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LEACHY48

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Re: Chris King (GN) article
« Reply #40 on: July 29, 2018, 06:17:31 PM »

Or maybe softer pressed so that  bat fibres uncurl  quicker allowing a faster trampoline effect.

That just isnt what happens, if youve ever had an under pressed bat, youd quickly realise this is BS. If a bat is under pressed it does not perform. Simple as. Nothing about the fibres uncurling allowing faster response thats utter tosh.
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Novak

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Re: Chris King (GN) article
« Reply #41 on: July 29, 2018, 07:07:16 PM »

Explains a lot about my tKs they are fairly young
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JK Lewis

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Re: Chris King (GN) article
« Reply #42 on: July 29, 2018, 09:56:10 PM »

Quick question there is something I read about grains Vs more grains


True or false 5 grains bat is a younger bat then a 12 grain bat ?

I think that's true ?

How does that effect the bat ? If at all ?  Does a younger bat take longer to open up ?

The 5 grains on a 5 grain bat are the same age as the 5 grains on one side of a 12 grain bat. This is easiest to understand if the 12 grain bat has heartwood along one edge. In that case, the 'red' edge is the older wood, from closer to the centre of the tree. The 5 grains that count in from the 'white' edge - the sapwood - are the 5 years of most recent growth. So, the average age of the wood of a 5 grain bat is less than the average age of the wood of a 12 grain bat. But the outside 5 grains are the same age.
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leatherseat

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Re: Chris King (GN) article
« Reply #43 on: July 30, 2018, 07:15:18 AM »

True the less  grains there is the younger  the tree generally the fewer the grains the longer the bat takes to reach its potenial

E ach grain represents a year of growth. If a bat has 5 grains - the wood has grown more quickly than a blade say 15 grains.
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Biggie Smalls

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Re: Chris King (GN) article
« Reply #44 on: July 30, 2018, 07:59:02 AM »

The 5 grains on a 5 grain bat are the same age as the 5 grains on one side of a 12 grain bat. This is easiest to understand if the 12 grain bat has heartwood along one edge. In that case, the 'red' edge is the older wood, from closer to the centre of the tree. The 5 grains that count in from the 'white' edge - the sapwood - are the 5 years of most recent growth. So, the average age of the wood of a 5 grain bat is less than the average age of the wood of a 12 grain bat. But the outside 5 grains are the same









Great explanation.


 I always knew a bat that has twelve grains is twelve years old and older than a 5 grain/5 year old bat . I know red wood is older wood , closer to the centre . I know that on a 5 grain bat those grains have grown  quicker than that on a 12 grain bat .
Yet , i was overlooking the simple extension of this logic .....not all the bat is the same age . A 12 grain bat  with heartwood would have 2 edges that are substantially different in age . Cant believe i never thought of it that way before.
I'm not stupid (i promise) but sometimes my brain overlooks some obvious , logical things.
« Last Edit: July 30, 2018, 08:12:39 AM by Biggie Smalls »
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