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Author Topic: Standing deep in the crease  (Read 1374 times)

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RPC/Blueroom Cricket - Adie

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Standing deep in the crease
« on: January 20, 2019, 07:12:50 PM »

Thoughts peeps

Normally I basiclaly stand with my back big toe on middle on the crease line to face up vs everything from pace to medium (spin just behind). However, Ive been trailing after watching tests standing half way back in my crease.. to say its made life easier is an understatement.

Ive found suddnely its a lot easier and anything that a bowler would think is back of a length or length is easily back foot punched or pulled. However, Ive seen Mr Balance and Mr Handscombe... they look bloody awful

So, does anyone bat like this at our level or is it just too darn risky with crappy wickets ??

Ive done extreme pace and with swing to see if simply pitching it up swinging would get me and it doesnt seem to.

Just kinda thinking it feels a little too good to be true currently
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LateBloomer

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Re: Standing deep in the crease
« Reply #1 on: January 20, 2019, 10:07:50 PM »

I have the crease line in the middle of my feet or slightly towards my back foot in my stance, have always done this. The only times I will deviate from this is a) new ball bowler swinging big with the keeper back, id come out of my crease to nullify swing and disrupt length. b) towards the death overs where I basically walk all over the place to open up angles and again disrupt the bowler

Could make a case for going deeper on hard wickets with quickish bowlers aswell. Depends where your strengths are

I wouldnt want to go too deep too often as there might be driving opportunities missed, depends on pitch/bowler
« Last Edit: January 20, 2019, 10:11:44 PM by LateBloomer »
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cricketbadger

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Re: Standing deep in the crease
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2019, 12:26:34 AM »

Something I have been thinking about, but not quite confident enough in the wickets and standard of umpiring to give it a go
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adb club cricketer

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Re: Standing deep in the crease
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2019, 02:46:46 AM »

I think there are more professionals playing deep inside the crease than we realize. Most back and across trigger players do end up deep in the crease after their trigger, e.g.  De Villiers, Steve Smith, Rahane etc., to name a few and they do quite good, though only Handscomb takes the flak for the same technique just because he is starting deep and not triggering but if you think when ball is released, his position from the stumps might not be so much different as the back and across trigger guys ....

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Re: Standing deep in the crease
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2019, 07:05:30 AM »

I cut the crease in my stance/line is on the inside of my back foot, so maybe not as far back as you.

I am an opener and have batted like this for years, it definitely gives you that fraction more time, I find the most important thing is that it turns more deliveries into short balls which is my strength. That's what's it's about doing what you can to to make things in your favour.

I will say that the bowlers I struggle with most because of it are the dobbers who swing it miles.

It also depends on the standard you play because genuinely good bowlers will be able to adjust anyways.
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Seniorplayer

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Re: Standing deep in the crease
« Reply #5 on: January 21, 2019, 09:14:59 AM »

As an opener who plays the hook and pull at anything slightly short tried  this gave me more time to see the ball inc late movement but was always aware of  stepping on the stumps never comfortable with it mainly due to uneven bounce and getting done LBW.
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SLA

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Re: Standing deep in the crease
« Reply #6 on: January 21, 2019, 12:54:57 PM »

So, you won't read about this in a 1950s coaching manual, but most professional batsmen practice one-foot weighting, which is why you see the big back-and-across movement before the ball is released. It simplifies and speeds-up the foot movement phase of the shot.

Its slowly starting to filter down into amateur cricket, I'm coaching it to the juniors I work with.
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cricketbadger

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Re: Standing deep in the crease
« Reply #7 on: January 21, 2019, 01:41:36 PM »

As an opener who plays the hook and pull at anything slightly short tried  this gave me more time to see the ball inc late movement but was always aware of  stepping on the stumps never comfortable with it mainly due to uneven bounce and getting done LBW.

Very similar to myself. Standing deeper therefore gives me a few more short balls to go at and time at our level
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Kez

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Re: Standing deep in the crease
« Reply #8 on: January 21, 2019, 02:00:36 PM »

@SLA one foot weighting- do you mean back-loading? As per power hitting/ baseball thoughts?
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Re: Standing deep in the crease
« Reply #9 on: January 21, 2019, 02:19:37 PM »

@SLA one foot weighting- do you mean back-loading? As per power hitting/ baseball thoughts?

There are similarities, but the purpose is different. Back-loading and a rigid front leg are techniques used to involve the core muscles in hitting and add power and bat-speed, whereas one-foot weighting is used to simplify decision making/decrease the amount of separate movements you have to make before hitting the ball.

For example, if you start with your weight balanced across both feet, the sequence of events before you hit the ball is:

Front foot shot:

Put weight on back foot -> lift front foot -> lean forward -> plant front foot -> play shot

Back foot shot:

Put weight on front foot -> lift back foot -> push back foot back -> plant back foot -> play shot

Whereas if you already have all your weight on the back foot, the sequence is shorter:

Front foot shot:

lift front foot -> lean forward -> plant front foot -> play shot

Back foot shot:

lean in to cut/rotate to pull -> play shot

Of course, this requires your back foot to be planted in a position from which you can comfortably play a back foot shot without any additional foot movement, eg, slightly back and across, a position from which you can defend, drive, glance, cut and pull all without moving your feet. If you watch pros, you'll see they don't actually move back to play back foot shots.

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Batbuddy99

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Re: Standing deep in the crease
« Reply #10 on: January 21, 2019, 02:35:58 PM »

There are similarities, but the purpose is different. Back-loading and a rigid front leg are techniques used to involve the core muscles in hitting and add power and bat-speed, whereas one-foot weighting is used to simplify decision making/decrease the amount of separate movements you have to make before hitting the ball.

For example, if you start with your weight balanced across both feet, the sequence of events before you hit the ball is:

Front foot shot:

Put weight on back foot -> lift front foot -> lean forward -> plant front foot -> play shot

Back foot shot:

Put weight on front foot -> lift back foot -> push back foot back -> plant back foot -> play shot

Whereas if you already have all your weight on the back foot, the sequence is shorter:

Front foot shot:

lift front foot -> lean forward -> plant front foot -> play shot

Back foot shot:

lean in to cut/rotate to pull -> play shot

Of course, this requires your back foot to be planted in a position from which you can comfortably play a back foot shot without any additional foot movement, eg, slightly back and across, a position from which you can defend, drive, glance, cut and pull all without moving your feet. If you watch pros, you'll see they don't actually move back to play back foot shots.
Over the last season I implemented a similar idea into my technique, only having the weight over the front foot, as it meant I was in a stable enough position to play any front foot shot i liked without moving my feet, and I naturally played my cuts/pulls off the front foot (ricky ponting style) anyway. This meant my head was stiller throughout the shot, meaning I hit the ball better. The only possible weakness was the wide flashy drive, so I told myself not to play it as it's a high risk shot anyway, so now I just leave those deliveries.
When I felt I was playing well and had got myself in I would then sometimes start to move about a bit to put off bowlers, but only really when trying to push for runs.
Another consequence is I do look quite crabby now, but I don't mind that.
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Buzz

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Re: Standing deep in the crease
« Reply #11 on: January 21, 2019, 02:46:18 PM »

There are similarities, but the purpose is different. Back-loading and a rigid front leg are techniques used to involve the core muscles in hitting and add power and bat-speed, whereas one-foot weighting is used to simplify decision making/decrease the amount of separate movements you have to make before hitting the ball.

For example, if you start with your weight balanced across both feet, the sequence of events before you hit the ball is:

Front foot shot:

Put weight on back foot -> lift front foot -> lean forward -> plant front foot -> play shot

Back foot shot:

Put weight on front foot -> lift back foot -> push back foot back -> plant back foot -> play shot

Whereas if you already have all your weight on the back foot, the sequence is shorter:

Front foot shot:

lift front foot -> lean forward -> plant front foot -> play shot

Back foot shot:

lean in to cut/rotate to pull -> play shot

Of course, this requires your back foot to be planted in a position from which you can comfortably play a back foot shot without any additional foot movement, eg, slightly back and across, a position from which you can defend, drive, glance, cut and pull all without moving your feet. If you watch pros, you'll see they don't actually move back to play back foot shots.
Not sure I agree with the weighting principles you are suggesting here.
If, for example your weight is on your front foot and you lean to the ball with your head, your weight shouldn't move back then forward, although you might use power from your back leg to move forward.

The de-weighting of your front foot can allow a batter to move into position better, but it reduces your back foot options.

As for where you stand in your crease, Haydon used to bat out of his crease, Strauss well back. Two different but successful methods. Changing your position is personal, but worth experimenting with.
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SLA

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Re: Standing deep in the crease
« Reply #12 on: January 21, 2019, 02:52:52 PM »

Not sure I agree with the weighting principles you are suggesting here.
If, for example your weight is on your front foot and you lean to the ball with your head, your weight shouldn't move back then forward, although you might use power from your back leg to move forward.

It does, that's how the human body works.

Try it. Stand with your weight on both feet. Now lift your right foot up. The very first thing that happens - before you can lift your right foot - is that you shift your weight onto your left foot. Its physically impossible to lift your right foot without first shifting your bodyweight off it, if you tried it, you'd just crumple in a heap. Of course, this is all so natural to humans that we don't even notice we're doing it.
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Buzz

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Re: Standing deep in the crease
« Reply #13 on: January 21, 2019, 03:00:10 PM »

But when you bat you aren't lifting your front foot. Your head is leaning to the ball and you topple into position. It isn't the same.

Try it.

Batting is leading with your head, not leading with your foot. Putting your foot to the pitch if the ball is the biggest misnomer in batting. It is head over the ball.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2019, 03:02:32 PM by Buzz »
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SLA

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Re: Standing deep in the crease
« Reply #14 on: January 21, 2019, 03:00:27 PM »

Over the last season I implemented a similar idea into my technique, only having the weight over the front foot, as it meant I was in a stable enough position to play any front foot shot i liked without moving my feet, and I naturally played my cuts/pulls off the front foot (ricky ponting style) anyway. This meant my head was stiller throughout the shot, meaning I hit the ball better. The only possible weakness was the wide flashy drive, so I told myself not to play it as it's a high risk shot anyway, so now I just leave those deliveries.
When I felt I was playing well and had got myself in I would then sometimes start to move about a bit to put off bowlers, but only really when trying to push for runs.
Another consequence is I do look quite crabby now, but I don't mind that.

Yes, its possible to do it the other way round (sometimes call front-foot dogging), but as you've noticed, it cuts out your ability to play a cover drive. You can play straight quite easily though. A lot of bowlers see a batsman putting their weight forward and instantly bang it in short - but obviously this is exactly what a front foot dogger wants, as his back foot is already de-weighted and he can bounce back into a pull shot very easily. A better strategy is to bowl full and wide.

De-weighting the back foot is actually recommended against spin (the front foot press), as it encourages the batsman to always move their back foot first, which is never a bad idea against spin, as it encourages you to either take a decent stride back or make a 1-2 shuffle down the pitch - both good tactics.




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