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Author Topic: Cricket Fever - Netflix Documentary Mumbai Indians  (Read 776 times)

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jdownesbcfc

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Cricket Fever - Netflix Documentary Mumbai Indians
« on: March 04, 2019, 09:29:04 AM »

Has anyone watched it?

I am about halfway through and absolutely staggered. Like most on here, I am a cricket fanatic and so I have enjoyed the series so far, although in general I'd say it's a pretty poor production in terms of flow and delivery.

The content is interesting to cricket lovers in terms of looking behind the scenes and seeing the pro's practice, socialise etc and their backstory, but the most striking thing for me is how unprofessional everything is for a top level sports team with the cash at stake. The analysis shown (which admittedly could be because of secrecy) is so poor and everything seems very chaotic in terms of training/squad selection etc

Any thoughts
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LukeFramBurton

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Re: Cricket Fever - Netflix Documentary Mumbai Indians
« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2019, 11:06:24 AM »

I didnt even realise that this was on Netflix - mainly because my feed is full of crime documentaries and animated dinosaurs (the joys of family life). Ill get it watched ASAP and comment. Im a big fan of stats so Ill keep an eye out for (the lack of) them!
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jdownesbcfc

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Re: Cricket Fever - Netflix Documentary Mumbai Indians
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2019, 12:28:22 PM »

Cheers Luke, look forward to your thoughts. My main thought is that MI are not very methodical or analytical by the looks, which for a high level sports team in 2019 is a big surprise. And some of the athletes are complete amateurs. Makes me think how good they could be if they applied themselves correctly.
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LukeFramBurton

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Re: Cricket Fever - Netflix Documentary Mumbai Indians
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2019, 12:43:27 PM »

It would be interesting to see what sort of impact the franchise system will have on cricket. When clubs have players tied down to a long contract, have their own training facilities and a strong staffing structure in place to support, is it different to when players are simply signed for a season and use facilities and staff that arent owned/full-time employed by the club?
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sfa82

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Re: Cricket Fever - Netflix Documentary Mumbai Indians
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2019, 02:02:18 PM »

I watched the whole season this past weekend. The back stories were very interesting. They obviously could not cover every aspect, but what was clear is that with such big squads, it becomes very difficult to keep the fringe players completely engaged all the time.

It also felt that they had clear favourites in terms of team selection and would do everything to keep those players in the team, e.g. Pollard, Kisan, etc. But overall a very enjoyable watch.
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LukeFramBurton

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Re: Cricket Fever - Netflix Documentary Mumbai Indians
« Reply #5 on: March 24, 2019, 07:25:49 AM »

Im slowly making my way through the series (generally waiting for my wife to go to bed after watching a crime documentary!) and it is an enjoyable watch.

It definitely comes across like they have a very romantic view of team selection - as has already been said, they stick to a lot of favourites even when, quite frankly, they have been playing crap. They definitely had a high proportion of their starting XI decided before the auction started and it was just a matter of how much money they had left after re-signing Pandya and filling out the roster.

Im guessing that they cut out some of the more tactical/technical side of the coaching and training - I dont think its aimed at hardcore cricket fans, so they assume that viewers arent too bothered about an in-depth discussion of the merits of Bumrahs slower deliveries.

It looks like they would benefit from some better analysis, perhaps similar to the Moneyball type approach in baseball. So many of the games were being lost in the last few overs when bowling because there didnt seem to be a designated death bowler or any sort of plan for different game situations.

I did like the onesie punishment though.
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