Advertise on CBF

Pages: 1 [2] 3

Author Topic: Staying side on  (Read 1451 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Yorkershire

  • County 1st XI
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 713
  • Trade Count: (+5)
Re: Staying side on
« Reply #15 on: February 10, 2020, 09:25:50 PM »

I used to bat side on with guard on middle and leg. I never really played anything on my leg side and never moved across ..with plenty of lbws..

After some coaching..I was advised to move guard to middle and open my stance.. very similar to what Gary Palmer recommends.. it improved my batting massively.. went from turn up and hope for the best to having a plana and structure... understanding why I was doing what I was..

I also was slow in sorting my footwork early in the innings..

Personally I see side on too restrictive especially like me you take time to get your feet moving.. I'm in the school of setting up and staying still and keeping shape..
Logged

InternalTraining

  • World Cup Winner
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4155
  • Trade Count: (0)
Re: Staying side on
« Reply #16 on: February 10, 2020, 09:45:13 PM »

^ I suspect this "side-on" and "off-side" scoring nonsense is one of those unquestioned traditions of cricket where everyone just does them because that's  the tradition. KP, Smith, Labuschagne, and few others have pretty much proven that you don't need to blindly follow the orthodoxy.
Logged

Buzz

  • Administrator
  • International Superstar
  • *****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 11538
  • Trade Count: (+12)
  • Clear your mind, stay still and watch the ball
Re: Staying side on
« Reply #17 on: February 10, 2020, 09:47:50 PM »

KP and Marnus have/had magnificent technique.
In KP's case he also had the ability to do the insane.
Logged
"Bradman didn't used to have any trigger movements or anything like that. He turned batting into a subconscious act" Tony Shillinglaw.

Yorkershire

  • County 1st XI
  • ***
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 713
  • Trade Count: (+5)
Re: Staying side on
« Reply #18 on: February 10, 2020, 09:51:16 PM »

^ I suspect this "side-on" and "off-side" scoring nonsense is one of those unquestioned traditions of cricket where everyone just does them because that's  the tradition. KP, Smith, Labuschagne, and few others have pretty much proven that you don't need to blindly follow the orthodoxy.

Agree.. it was just the way it was ... was never coached as a youngster but every cricket book for youngsters I read it was side on..  also the reason i never scored legside was because I was too closed off..

Well at 40 years of age it was enlightening a bit of coaching.. wasted years I wish I had some earlier...

But I can't play these ramp shots and switch hitting you youngsters play... its feels.completely alien.. :D
Logged

Buzz

  • Administrator
  • International Superstar
  • *****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 11538
  • Trade Count: (+12)
  • Clear your mind, stay still and watch the ball
Re: Staying side on
« Reply #19 on: February 10, 2020, 10:01:03 PM »

Imagine you are watching a pendulum swing back and forward.

That is the flow of your bat.

And that is why being side on is helpful
Logged
"Bradman didn't used to have any trigger movements or anything like that. He turned batting into a subconscious act" Tony Shillinglaw.

SouthpawMark

  • County 2nd XI
  • ***
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 464
  • Trade Count: (0)
Re: Staying side on
« Reply #20 on: February 10, 2020, 10:34:19 PM »

Im very much a Gary Palmer fan. I see him for a couple of hours each week, and the improvement in my batting has been enormous. I know a lot of people think batting is a side on game, And shudder at the thought of batting with your feet and shoulders open, but persevere with it and youll find that it really does work for shots all around the wicket. Its been a revelation for me, in particular the on drive and the pull, but its also really improved my timing through the off side on front and back foot.
Logged
Bat perv.

InternalTraining

  • World Cup Winner
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4155
  • Trade Count: (0)
Re: Staying side on
« Reply #21 on: February 10, 2020, 11:00:18 PM »

Im very much a Gary Palmer fan. I see him for a couple of hours each week, and the improvement in my batting has been enormous. I know a lot of people think batting is a side on game, And shudder at the thought of batting with your feet and shoulders open, but persevere with it and youll find that it really does work for shots all around the wicket. Its been a revelation for me, in particular the on drive and the pull, but its also really improved my timing through the off side on front and back foot.

Another Gary Palmer fanboy. :D

I like Gary's technique a lot and I've had great results after applying his techniques to my game as well. As I wrote earlier, my off-side options are a bit limited. It doesn't mean I don't score run - thank you 2/3 fielders on the on/leg side :D - I would like to score in the cover-point, cover, and extra-cover areas as freely as I do mid-off to fine leg. I just can't generate enough power (maybe bat's too heavy @ 2-11?) like I do straight, towards on, leg side.
Logged

SouthpawMark

  • County 2nd XI
  • ***
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 464
  • Trade Count: (0)
Re: Staying side on
« Reply #22 on: February 10, 2020, 11:17:42 PM »

Another Gary Palmer fanboy. :D

I like Gary's technique a lot and I've had great results after applying his techniques to my game as well. As I wrote earlier, my off-side options are a bit limited. It doesn't mean I don't score run - thank you 2/3 fielders on the on/leg side :D - I would like to score in the cover-point, cover, and extra-cover areas as freely as I do mid-off to fine leg. I just can't generate enough power (maybe bat's too heavy @ 2-11?) like I do straight, towards on, leg side.

For the offside he tells me to lead with my head and shoulder, and the feet will naturally follow. His thing is all about getting the head over the ball, rather than getting your foot to the pitch. He still wants you to square up your shoulders a bit more when hitting through the off side, and it takes a while to get used to it. Its lucky his training is all about repetition - it clicked with me pretty quickly, maybe within 50 balls. Hitting through the the off side with open feet and shoulders will just result in a handsy slap with a lack of control and power. I doubt the weight of bat has anything to do with it.
Logged
Bat perv.

brokenbat

  • International Captain
  • ****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 1864
  • Trade Count: (0)
Re: Staying side on
« Reply #23 on: February 11, 2020, 01:06:34 AM »

Im very much a Gary Palmer fan. I see him for a couple of hours each week, and the improvement in my batting has been enormous. I know a lot of people think batting is a side on game, And shudder at the thought of batting with your feet and shoulders open, but persevere with it and youll find that it really does work for shots all around the wicket. Its been a revelation for me, in particular the on drive and the pull, but its also really improved my timing through the off side on front and back foot.

So how does Gary recommend playing the drive? Point back toe down the ground and THEN play the shot? Or does this back toe pointing down pitch happen during the shot?
Logged

SouthpawMark

  • County 2nd XI
  • ***
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 464
  • Trade Count: (0)
Re: Staying side on
« Reply #24 on: February 11, 2020, 05:57:23 AM »

So how does Gary recommend playing the drive? Point back toe down the ground and THEN play the shot? Or does this back toe pointing down pitch happen during the shot?

The back toe points down during the shot, the idea being that as you open up your hips your back foot pivots around. It works well for me, as I hate the feel of having my back foot anchored to the ground. It was actually one of the things that really appealed to me when I first read about his coaching.

The way he drills it in to you is to make you hit balls with both of your feet already pointing straight down the ground, with my right foot slightly ahead of my left (Im left handed) with my shoulders open and the bat raised and pointing at 2nd slip. He varies it up by making you hit in a static position, taking a step in to the ball, and by hitting and then raising your back foot in the air (this shows that youre not reaching for it, as youd lose your balance. After youve hit some balls you revert to your more orthodox stance, and it slowly becomes ingrained. Another drill is to hit with both feet pointing forward, then orthodox and then forward etc etc.

Ive found having the rear foot pointing forward at impact really helps me with my timing, and if you get the timing of the movement (mainly the hips) in sync it creates an enormous amount of power. The key is to not shut your shoulders at all when hitting straight or on the on side. The only time you close them slightly is when you want to hit through the off side.
Logged
Bat perv.

edge

  • Moderator
  • World Cup Winner
  • *****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 4196
  • Trade Count: (0)
Re: Staying side on
« Reply #25 on: February 11, 2020, 09:11:19 AM »

^ I suspect this "side-on" and "off-side" scoring nonsense is one of those unquestioned traditions of cricket where everyone just does them because that's  the tradition. KP, Smith, Labuschagne, and few others have pretty much proven that you don't need to blindly follow the orthodoxy.
KP and Smith? I think WG Grace put the off side and closed off thing to bed 100 years ago!

So many amateurs stand closed off or move their front foot to close themselves off that it's no wonders Gary Palmer can work wonders. As with most things, the answer tends to be somewhere in the middle - close yourself off too much and you'll struggle off your legs, open up too much and you're not gonna hit many between cover and the slips. Surprisingly enough the majority of good players stand slightly open.
Logged
HS: 156, BB: 7-20

InternalTraining

  • World Cup Winner
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4155
  • Trade Count: (0)
Re: Staying side on
« Reply #26 on: February 11, 2020, 01:30:24 PM »

I think WG Grace put the off side and closed off thing to bed 100 years ago!

Yeah, but he is not on YouTube so I can't really comment.
Logged

InternalTraining

  • World Cup Winner
  • *****
  • Offline Offline
  • Posts: 4155
  • Trade Count: (0)
Re: Staying side on
« Reply #27 on: February 11, 2020, 01:42:33 PM »

The back toe points down during the shot, the idea being that as you open up your hips your back foot pivots around. It works well for me, as I hate the feel of having my back foot anchored to the ground. It was actually one of the things that really appealed to me when I first read about his coaching.

The way he drills it in to you is to make you hit balls with both of your feet already pointing straight down the ground, with my right foot slightly ahead of my left (Im left handed) with my shoulders open and the bat raised and pointing at 2nd slip. He varies it up by making you hit in a static position, taking a step in to the ball, and by hitting and then raising your back foot in the air (this shows that youre not reaching for it, as youd lose your balance. After youve hit some balls you revert to your more orthodox stance, and it slowly becomes ingrained. Another drill is to hit with both feet pointing forward, then orthodox and then forward etc etc.

Ive found having the rear foot pointing forward at impact really helps me with my timing, and if you get the timing of the movement (mainly the hips) in sync it creates an enormous amount of power. The key is to not shut your shoulders at all when hitting straight or on the on side. The only time you close them slightly is when you want to hit through the off side.

So, the idea is that you transition from an "orthodox" backfoot stance to toe-pointing-down when you play your shot (like a golf swing). Is that right? Or do you start your shot with both toe pointing down?

Here is what I have noticed: I see the ball better when both toes are pointing down before I start my swing but (this is a big but) in that setup,  I find it easier to play check-drives rather than full blooded drives.
Logged

SouthpawMark

  • County 2nd XI
  • ***
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 464
  • Trade Count: (0)
Re: Staying side on
« Reply #28 on: February 11, 2020, 01:55:59 PM »

So, the idea is that you transition from an "orthodox" backfoot stance to toe-pointing-down when you play your shot (like a golf swing). Is that right? Or do you start your shot with both toe pointing down?

Here is what I have noticed: I see the ball better when both toes are pointing down before I start my swing but (this is a big but) in that setup,  I find it easier to play check-drives rather than full blooded drives.

No, the back foot should already be angled forward. Not straight down the wicket, but pointing somewhere in the direction of cover/extra cover.

Its easier to see the ball because you have a clearer view of it due to your shoulder already being out of the way. Its great for pulls and hooks as it eliminates that momentary blind spot. You may well check your drives because you dont feel balanced enough to play with the full follow through. I did the same at first, but you soon get used to the feel.
Logged
Bat perv.

Buzz

  • Administrator
  • International Superstar
  • *****
  • Online Online
  • Posts: 11538
  • Trade Count: (+12)
  • Clear your mind, stay still and watch the ball
Re: Staying side on
« Reply #29 on: February 11, 2020, 02:06:21 PM »

Can you explain the blind spot comment please because I really don't get it.

As someone with pretty orthodox technique, I have never had a blind spot to the short ball.
And I have always played it perfectly 😂😂


As for the change in alignment of feet thing, if it works for you, great, it isn't for me.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2020, 02:10:27 PM by Buzz »
Logged
"Bradman didn't used to have any trigger movements or anything like that. He turned batting into a subconscious act" Tony Shillinglaw.
Pages: 1 [2] 3
 

Advertise on CBF