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Author Topic: Netting clips  (Read 1278 times)

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mohawks94

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Re: Netting clips
« Reply #15 on: April 27, 2020, 05:09:34 PM »

If that's your role, why so timid in training?

Working on batting time, going up a division means I will be needed to bat more than five times in 12 1s games.
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InternalTraining

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Re: Netting clips
« Reply #16 on: April 27, 2020, 05:19:12 PM »

I've been working on not going so hard at the ball, which is why a lot of the time I'm not completing shots.

You don't have to go hard at all, make clean contact and complete the shot. Gary Palmer has tons of videos on this. Here is a start: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4jSxExtPkM .
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pablomarmite

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Re: Netting clips
« Reply #17 on: April 27, 2020, 08:11:34 PM »

On the second video it looks like your trigger is putting your feet on top of each other and not giving you any kind of base to work from but it is hard to say without a side view. Your back foot seem to be the one more often than not trying to make the angle you want for a shot because it is the one that can move most easily as the front foot is cramped. It is probably easier to play back foot shots from that starting position where you can spring back from you front foot when on your toes but I've always felt it locks and cramps your front foot from going anywhere forwards. So you might be trying to do good stuff with your head but your feet and base are working against you IMO.

Others may well have a different opinion but basically I think your trigger is trapping and cramping your front foot meaning your hands and back leg are trying to make room and manufacture a shot. I wouldn't worry about "getting your feet moving", I'd worry about a balanced base and then head/ front shoulder in to the ball. Buzz'll love that but I'm sure other disagree :D

I wouldn't be over the moon about a coach cheering when they get you out either!

I agree that your issue seems to be your trigger movement. Hard to tell from video 2 as can't see exact time ball is released but it looks like your trigger is not completed so on the move as ball is bowled. If you are a late order bat facing older ball I would consider batting middle/middle off and trying opening up your stance and standing still. Then just whack it!
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LEACHY48

Re: Netting clips
« Reply #18 on: April 27, 2020, 09:03:49 PM »

If you ask me, the following are your issues.

1) you are never stable - Gio Collusi, who I regard as one of the best coaches around and many pros do too, says to time the ball is about moving from stable to stable, you must be stable at release, and stable at contact, you appear to be neither, there is no weight on your front foot at release, and therefore you're not stable - this comes down to your trigger. The whole purpose of a trigger movement is to get you ready into a stable position to move again, if it's not doing this then it is a bit pointless. You also jump into position at times and again, this means you are unstable at release, your head is moved 100times more than it needs to, the more moving parts to a technique the harder it is to make it work for you. Your trigger is also never consistent, it isn't the same 2 balls in a row from what I can see, one ball your straight back, next back and across, next jumping, next back and across and taking all weight off the front foot etc etc.

2) your hands start 'up' , and there is no formal backlift, which is meaning you are having to just stop the ball rather than accelerate your hands through it.

Because you are not stable, your front foot is landing early, and because you don't pick your hands up from a neutral position there is no delay in your swing.

My reccomend fix?
1) ditch the trigger, and get set and stable,
2) keep your hands in a relaxed position, then as you sight the ball after release, your wrists cock, and your hands go back creating separation between hand and hips, you unweight the bat, then naturally as your heel lands, your bat will flow through, and your downswing will start.

My biggest recommendation however, is to filter out the plethora of bad advice you will inevitably get, everyone has an opinion, some better than others, you don't want to get bogged down with too much technique, and that's why the fixes I've reccomended are pretty simple and basic. If you over analyse you will never settle on a technique and you'll never score runs.
« Last Edit: April 27, 2020, 09:16:47 PM by LEACHY48 »
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brokenbat

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Re: Netting clips
« Reply #19 on: April 27, 2020, 10:01:11 PM »

I would also record playing normal bowling. Many times, we bat one way vs the machine and another vs real bowlers. Youll always be slightly out of sync when facing machine.
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cricketbadger

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Re: Netting clips
« Reply #20 on: April 28, 2020, 12:03:29 PM »

If you ask me, the following are your issues.

1) you are never stable - Gio Collusi, who I regard as one of the best coaches around and many pros do too, says to time the ball is about moving from stable to stable, you must be stable at release, and stable at contact, you appear to be neither, there is no weight on your front foot at release, and therefore you're not stable - this comes down to your trigger. The whole purpose of a trigger movement is to get you ready into a stable position to move again, if it's not doing this then it is a bit pointless. You also jump into position at times and again, this means you are unstable at release, your head is moved 100times more than it needs to, the more moving parts to a technique the harder it is to make it work for you. Your trigger is also never consistent, it isn't the same 2 balls in a row from what I can see, one ball your straight back, next back and across, next jumping, next back and across and taking all weight off the front foot etc etc.

2) your hands start 'up' , and there is no formal backlift, which is meaning you are having to just stop the ball rather than accelerate your hands through it.

Because you are not stable, your front foot is landing early, and because you don't pick your hands up from a neutral position there is no delay in your swing.

My reccomend fix?
1) ditch the trigger, and get set and stable,
2) keep your hands in a relaxed position, then as you sight the ball after release, your wrists cock, and your hands go back creating separation between hand and hips, you unweight the bat, then naturally as your heel lands, your bat will flow through, and your downswing will start.

My biggest recommendation however, is to filter out the plethora of bad advice you will inevitably get, everyone has an opinion, some better than others, you don't want to get bogged down with too much technique, and that's why the fixes I've reccomended are pretty simple and basic. If you over analyse you will never settle on a technique and you'll never score runs.

Great post and advice

Funny you mentioned trigger movements, just reading April's The Cricketer, goes through each counties prospects for the season and for Yorkshire they mention Harry Brook. How last season he struggled, and they simply put this down to a lack of trigger movement. I think that theory is a load of (No Swearing Please), how can such a drop in form be blamed on a lack of trigger movement. Laughable if you ask me
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