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Author Topic: First home made bat - designed by artificial intelligence  (Read 2559 times)

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DorsetDan

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Re: First home made bat - designed by artificial intelligence
« Reply #30 on: August 14, 2020, 03:23:42 PM »

Didn't Hunts make a bat almost identical to this and put honeycomb or something in the gaps?


The one I remember from my yoof was quite traditional with honeycombe strips

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Kulli

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Re: First home made bat - designed by artificial intelligence
« Reply #31 on: August 14, 2020, 03:30:59 PM »

Modulus, wasnt really that much like this in shape though.
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DorsetDan

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Re: First home made bat - designed by artificial intelligence
« Reply #32 on: August 14, 2020, 03:36:05 PM »

I haven’t quite been able to get my head round those Algobats either. I don’t doubt that the algorithm is doing what it’s supposed to, but the parameter it’s aiming for isn’t necessarily going to mean that a bat is good or not. I think they do mention other studies and what they’ve looked at. I guess if there were 3D scans of good bats, then they could be analysed in the same way to see how they compare. Surely that’s been done?!

The "physics" if you can really call it that to make the "best" bat to hit a ball a long way in theory is to make it as stiff as possible, bring the first and second nodes of vibration as close together as possible, be as bottom heavy as possible and as a bonus, do this at the heaviest weight an individual can use. Basically increase the "swing weight" (horrible phrase) as much as possible and minimise losses as much as possible. When you put that in it is no surprise you get a stiff looking, bottom heavy shape. If they used blade length as a parameter then the result would have been a shorter blade so they could have improved it further based on their criteria ;) Lower density to provide a larger cross section would also aid the stiffness if you had a choice of wood.

The bit I don't get is that the whole design centred around cost and I struggle to believe that that shape could be made in Poplar and rival the best bats on shape alone which was their claim but of course very hard to test robustly.

The Algobat is a really interesting exercise to basically end up with a less sexy pre MCC gauge B'Mac/ Finch bat :D Those shapes might be an interesting next project @marsbug and you can see what people think of both :) B3 Have one of Finch's in the showroom and @procricket might still have pics of the BMac bat

« Last Edit: August 15, 2020, 08:59:23 AM by DorsetDan »
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InternalTraining

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Re: First home made bat - designed by artificial intelligence
« Reply #33 on: August 15, 2020, 12:49:04 AM »

The "physics" if you can really call it that to make the "best" bat to hit a ball a long way in theory is to make it as stiff as possible, bring the first and second nodes of percussion as close together as possible, be as bottom heavy as possible and as a bonus, do this at the heaviest weight an individual can use. Basically increase the "swing weight" (horrible phrase) as much as possible and minimise losses as much as possible.

How do you locate/identify "first and second nodes of percussion"? What losses are minimized when you increase the "swing weight"?
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DorsetDan

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Re: First home made bat - designed by artificial intelligence
« Reply #34 on: August 15, 2020, 09:13:36 AM »

*If any engineers bothered to read that I apologise for the poor language trying to dumb it down :D

First and second nodes of vibration are more or less properties of the shape, as is the centre of percussion (more or less). There are equations to calculate it. Those properties are about less vibration reaching the batter. In practical terms it just feels nicer to hit a ball there and there are fewer vibrations.

"Swing weight" isn't about minimising losses. It is the other side of the equation. Maximise what you put in. A big heavy, bottom heavy bat will hit a ball further. But of course you have to be able to swing hard enough and be able to actually hit the ball! Plus cricket isn't just about hitting a ball as far as you can but that is by the by :)
« Last Edit: August 15, 2020, 09:19:26 AM by DorsetDan »
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InternalTraining

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Re: First home made bat - designed by artificial intelligence
« Reply #35 on: August 15, 2020, 06:57:53 PM »

Ok.

I found this: http://epsassets.manchester.ac.uk/structural-concepts/StudentCoursework/contents/43.pdf

Is there a better document that describes the node of percussion and sweet spot?
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Buzz

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Re: First home made bat - designed by artificial intelligence
« Reply #36 on: August 15, 2020, 08:34:37 PM »

Some older YouTube vids from Andy Safbats Norbs talks a about this.
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marsbug

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Re: First home made bat - designed by artificial intelligence
« Reply #37 on: August 21, 2020, 04:25:05 PM »

Thanks for all the discussion of other bat shapes that are similar, I've had a great time looking them all up (and fell down a bit of a rabbit hole of old designs - e.g. https://number17rc.weebly.com/gray-nicolls-scoops.html#). And it's really good to have a summary of the vibration node stuff, after a few months of trying to read up on all of it.

I wanted to try a different way of sharing the actual shape, so have tried out a bit of 3D scanning software on my phone. It's ok as a quick first try (disclaimer: I do a bit of this photogrammetry at work, but can't get onto my fancy computers at the moment to do it properly!). But here is the link to a 3D model that you can move around:

https://skfb.ly/6UBPp

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billyb

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Re: First home made bat - designed by artificial intelligence
« Reply #38 on: August 21, 2020, 08:08:53 PM »

Never thought I'd see the word photogrammetry on this forum!  :D
Cool stuff. Did anyone ever use a GM Sigma? They had a funky design.
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DorsetDan

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Re: First home made bat - designed by artificial intelligence
« Reply #39 on: August 21, 2020, 08:32:26 PM »

I raise your photogrammetry with my stereo photogrammetry :D

I'd love to see a lot more variation in shapes
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Kulli

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Re: First home made bat - designed by artificial intelligence
« Reply #40 on: August 22, 2020, 12:17:49 AM »

That should be mandatory on all for sale threads in future!
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