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Author Topic: What's in a grade?  (Read 754 times)

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Rez

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What's in a grade?
« on: March 28, 2021, 07:22:50 PM »

I know this will have been done to death..... but.....  :D

It's not just subjectivity, it's a bit ridiculous!

Left to right: G1+, G1, G2, G3, G4. Take your pick!

birds in the sky wallpaper
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Jimbo

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Re: What's in a grade?
« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2021, 07:24:40 PM »

Does that "G4" on the end have some kind of pressing crack, storm damage or stain elsewhere on the bat by any chance?
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Rez

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Re: What's in a grade?
« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2021, 07:27:44 PM »

Does that "G4" on the end have some kind of pressing crack, storm damage or stain elsewhere on the bat by any chance?

Spot on. Storm damage (although you would do well to spot it).... the rest are defect free.
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AJ2014

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Re: What's in a grade?
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2021, 07:31:43 PM »

Can't make any choice like this, have to see their profile etc,
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SouthpawMark

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Re: What's in a grade?
« Reply #4 on: March 28, 2021, 07:38:48 PM »

If I was choosing a bat purely on aesthetic pleasure, the G1+ would be last on the list.
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Rez

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Re: What's in a grade?
« Reply #5 on: March 28, 2021, 07:39:52 PM »

Can't make any choice like this, have to see their profile etc,

You're missing the point.... imagine they are all your favourite profile....
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AJ2014

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Re: What's in a grade?
« Reply #6 on: March 28, 2021, 07:58:12 PM »

Don't know who's missing the point  but I don't choose based on grains, might have to do with my arms, I've given away perfect 21 grains butterfly as that felt heavy!
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Rez

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Re: What's in a grade?
« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2021, 08:03:57 PM »

OK, so imagine they are all your favourite profile and perfect weight :-)
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Jimbo

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Re: What's in a grade?
« Reply #8 on: March 28, 2021, 08:18:28 PM »

G1 or the G4 (if we pretend it's not storm damaged!). I have an absolutely lovely looking H4L sub grade bat that has a few pressing cracks but otherwise it's got a very clean face and nice grains, might not last forever but it'll look good while it does!
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Warneymonster

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Re: What's in a grade?
« Reply #9 on: March 31, 2021, 09:47:26 AM »

was on romida as planning on a visit when they reopen.

they have an interesting narrative on grading from Kookaburra (havent looked at other brands on there yet)

My understanding was that grading was mainly about aesthetics rather than performance, but they contradict themselves constantly in the below. are they saying the most attractive will perform the best?

Kookaburra Willow Grading

Kookaburra bats vary greatly in price and its obvious that more expensive bats will perform better than a cheaper one. Kookaburra evaluate each bat throughout the manufacturing process on the basis of how it plays or pings so you know what to expect from the particular grade you choose.

Most bats will have a combination of white and red wood. White wood is the more attractive part of the cleft of wood and is more responsive than the red wood. The red wood though is more durable than the white part.

Grade One: The most expensive willow and usually the most attractive blades. There may be some red wood evident on the blade and generally there will be at least 6 fairly straight grains. There may be a small knot or speck on the edge or back of the bat but the playing area should be clean.

Grade Two: Excellent quality but usually more red wood may be visible on the bat. This wont affect the playability of the bat. Similar number of grains as a grade 1 with potentially the odd blemish or butterfly mark on the face.

Grade Three: The most extensively used grade and certainly the most popular at Romida as it offers outstanding value for money. A grade 3 blade may have up to half the face with a tint or red wood colour but this wont affect the playability. This grade will have about five grains on the face which might not be straight and there is likely to be some specks or butterfly marks on the face.

Grade Four: Usually over half the blade will have red wood but the playability will be good. There are often only 4 grains and will have butterfly marks and specks on the bat.

Grade Five: This is very similar to a grade 4 but will have more stain in the wood so cosmetically will not be as good.
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ProCricketer1982

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Re: What's in a grade?
« Reply #10 on: March 31, 2021, 09:52:17 AM »

was on romida as planning on a visit when they reopen.

they have an interesting narrative on grading from Kookaburra (havent looked at other brands on there yet)

My understanding was that grading was mainly about aesthetics rather than performance, but they contradict themselves constantly in the below. are they saying the most attractive will perform the best?

Kookaburra Willow Grading

Kookaburra bats vary greatly in price and its obvious that more expensive bats will perform better than a cheaper one. Kookaburra evaluate each bat throughout the manufacturing process on the basis of how it plays or pings so you know what to expect from the particular grade you choose.

Most bats will have a combination of white and red wood. White wood is the more attractive part of the cleft of wood and is more responsive than the red wood. The red wood though is more durable than the white part.

Grade One: The most expensive willow and usually the most attractive blades. There may be some red wood evident on the blade and generally there will be at least 6 fairly straight grains. There may be a small knot or speck on the edge or back of the bat but the playing area should be clean.

Grade Two: Excellent quality but usually more red wood may be visible on the bat. This wont affect the playability of the bat. Similar number of grains as a grade 1 with potentially the odd blemish or butterfly mark on the face.

Grade Three: The most extensively used grade and certainly the most popular at Romida as it offers outstanding value for money. A grade 3 blade may have up to half the face with a tint or red wood colour but this wont affect the playability. This grade will have about five grains on the face which might not be straight and there is likely to be some specks or butterfly marks on the face.

Grade Four: Usually over half the blade will have red wood but the playability will be good. There are often only 4 grains and will have butterfly marks and specks on the bat.

Grade Five: This is very similar to a grade 4 but will have more stain in the wood so cosmetically will not be as good.

retail needs to make a case for charging more and more. By saying that the more expensive bats perform batter or look better means the price can go up.  If they literally just priced all willow the same regardless then we'd either have every bat at 400+ or every bat at 150
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Warneymonster

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Re: What's in a grade?
« Reply #11 on: March 31, 2021, 10:02:23 AM »

I appreciate that but they are a specialist shop so surely honesty is the best policy, the majority of bats they sell are G3's according to this

I would argue that there is one line which is a blatant lie ' it�s obvious that more expensive bats will perform better than a cheaper one'
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Warneymonster

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Re: What's in a grade?
« Reply #12 on: March 31, 2021, 10:05:26 AM »

3dsports are a little more vague on it but still going with the pay more hit it further line

Willow is graded by number, from Grade 1 being the most expensive to Grade 5 being the least expensive. The thing to bear in mind is that this grading only reflects the aesthetic appearance of the bat, and not the performance. For this reason, most manufacturers carry out their own internal grading and select bats based on the performance as well as aesthetics. If youre paying 450.00 for a top of the range bat, youd be very unhappy if it looked fantastic but didnt perform very well! This does also mean that some better bats (300+) may not look amazing aesthetically, but they are graded as such for their high levels of performance.

As you increase the price of the bat, the level of performance expected should also increase, and its your job as a customer to decide how much youre willing to invest against the kind of performance you expect.
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SouthpawMark

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Re: What's in a grade?
« Reply #13 on: March 31, 2021, 11:25:24 AM »

Out of all the major bat manufacturers, I have seen more G1 planks from Kookaburra than anyone else. I think their grading is all over the place.
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Warneymonster

Re: What's in a grade?
« Reply #14 on: March 31, 2021, 11:43:28 AM »

it makes the GM sig's look very good value
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